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A Running Tape Calculator

A Running Tape Calculator

Running Tape Calculator:

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A trick to estimating tape with just one sheet? The funny, creative and quick-to-implement way to knock-out the calculation pain.

Tape

I have been using this app for quite a long time now. It has an easy and clear user interface. The paper tape is what makes this the best calculator; you can see everything that you’ve entered on the tape, you can even go back and correct anything that you entered incorrectly and it will update the calculation. I like to keep notes as to why I am making a calculation and this tape allows you to add text to the right of entries and even type in a title before you start a calculation. Another great feature is that the tape can be saved. Love this! If I need to go back and check how I calculated some accounting or budget entry, I can just find the tape that I saved for those entries (you choose how to name the file) and I can check how I came about the results. Today’s tip comes courtesy of Francis Hayes – The Excel Addict, where he explains how to simulate a “paper tape” function in Excel. For you young’uns who are confused by this concept… in the olden days, people used to add numbers on an adding machine, which often produced a paper tape as the numbers were entered. You would get a total, plus a visual list of numbers that got you to that total. You could then confirm that you entered everything correctly. Some habits die hard however, and here’s how you can do the same type of “paper tape” function in Excel.

DeskCalc is a feature rich “paper tape calculator” with all of the functions you expect from a mechanical adding machine plus capabilities associated with a Windows environment. Features include: a check-strip with ergonomic text input options; data correction features (update, add and delete values); built-in formula interpreter; sales tax functions; memory function; percentage calculations; currency-conversion; floating point & fixed point calculations, thousands separators; fast correction key; display of the results in task strip and window title line; printing with heading and date/time; and export to Excel. Look for the additional keys on the machine. The key with the arrow pointed up is the paper advance key, which will allow you to add paper to your column of numbers without having anything printed on it. The key with the arrow pointed to the right will erase the last digit you've put into the machine. The "#" key will print a number on top of the tape without including it into the total. This is a useful key if you want to show a date on the tape. A key that reads "+0234F" is the decimal point selector key, which automatically defaults to two digits but can be adjusted to an infinite number. The key that has up and down arrows along with a fraction is how you select if you want figures rounded up or down when performing multiplication and division calculations. The other keys function in the same manner as a regular calculator. (Source: bizfluent.com)

Use

Since its introduction in 1888, when it was patented by Williams Burroughs, the adding machine with tape has been a staple in office environments. However, they have become a dinosaur in the modern office, since hand-held tiny calculators can be found at every turn. Using an adding machine with tape provides advantages that you can't get from a hand-held machine, though. First, it lets you check your work immediately. Second, you have a permanent dated record of your work. Third, if working with long rows of numbers, you can do a side-by-side comparison. This is just one of many great features of the Mac Calculator app, which is well featured and largely under appreciated, able to do function as a Scientific or Programmer calculator, calculate currency exchange rates and tons of units of measurement, and so much more. It’s certainly worth a second look if you have any mathematical needs. For simpler tasks and basic calculations, you may find that using Spotlight as a calculator remains the quickest on a Mac however.

Today’s tip comes courtesy of Francis Hayes – The Excel Addict, where he explains how to simulate a “paper tape” function in Excel. For you young’uns who are confused by this concept… in the olden days, people used to add numbers on an adding machine, which often produced a paper tape as the numbers were entered. You would get a total, plus a visual list of numbers that got you to that total. You could then confirm that you entered everything correctly. Some habits die hard however, and here’s how you can do the same type of “paper tape” function in Excel. I have been using this app for quite a long time now. It has an easy and clear user interface. The paper tape is what makes this the best calculator; you can see everything that you’ve entered on the tape, you can even go back and correct anything that you entered incorrectly and it will update the calculation. I like to keep notes as to why I am making a calculation and this tape allows you to add text to the right of entries and even type in a title before you start a calculation. Another great feature is that the tape can be saved. Love this! If I need to go back and check how I calculated some accounting or budget entry, I can just find the tape that I saved for those entries (you choose how to name the file) and I can check how I came about the results. (Source: apps.apple.com)

Tax

This adding machine calculator is useful for keeping a running total or "paper tape" when adding or subtracting money as in balancing your checkbook, doing your taxes, or any other calculation where you need to double check your entries. Input values and operators in the calculator, and review your math above. Print the adding machine "tape" to save a record of your calculations. Deskcalc is a full-featured adding machine with the functions you expect from a mechanical adding machine plus capabilities associated with a Windows environment. Features include a check-strip with comfortable text input per position, correction possibilities (rectifying, adding and deleting values), built-in formula interpreter, sales tax functions, cache (memory function), percentage calculation, currency-conversion, floating point- and fixed point-calculation, subdivision into thousands, fast correction key, display of the results in task strip and window title line, printing with heading and date/time, Excel-export.

DeskCalc is a feature rich “paper tape calculator” with all of the functions you expect from a mechanical adding machine plus capabilities associated with a Windows environment. Features include: a check-strip with ergonomic text input options; data correction features (update, add and delete values); built-in formula interpreter; sales tax functions; memory function; percentage calculations; currency-conversion; floating point & fixed point calculations, thousands separators; fast correction key; display of the results in task strip and window title line; printing with heading and date/time; and export to Excel. Suppose you sold three items priced at 26.95, 14.75 and 9.99 and you must collect a sales tax of 6.25% along with the total purchase. Enter the following (+26.95 +14.75 +9.99 6.25% ). Your calculator tape will show the subtotal of 51.69, a 6.25% tax of 3.23 and a total of 54.92 as in the image below. (Source: www.calculatorsoup.com)

 

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