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A Google Scientific Calculator With Fractions

A Google Scientific Calculator With Fractions

Google Scientific Calculator With Fractions

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Our scientific calculator app offers multiple features to carry out calculations with accuracy speed and accuracy. The calculator has all the features of a regular basic scientific calculator with few more like fraction calculator.

Fraction

The book begins with circles cut into pie slices, from halves to twelfths. The students need to determine what fraction of each pie is blue, yellow, and red. For example, if a pie is divided into fourths, two of which are blue, one yellow, and the other red, the student would answer one-half, one-fourth, and one-fourth. After ample practice with pie slices, the workbook moves onto triangles, squares, and hexagons. A couple of pages include groups of circles where kids need to determine fractions greater than one – for example, two and a half circles might be colored green. Other visual fraction problems include rectangles, smiley faces, arrows, letters, and numbers. Toward the end of the workbook, some questions ask about more than just colors – like what fraction of the arrows point up, or what fraction of the letters are vowels.The book begins with circles cut into pie slices, from halves to twelfths. The students need to determine what fraction of each pie is blue, yellow, and red. For example, if a pie is divided into fourths, two of which are blue, one yellow, and the other red, the student would answer one-half, one-fourth, and one-fourth. After ample practice with pie slices, the workbook moves onto triangles, squares, and hexagons. A couple of pages include groups of circles where kids need to determine fractions greater than one – for example, two and a half circles might be colored green. Other visual fraction problems include rectangles, smiley faces, arrows, letters, and numbers. Toward the end of the workbook, some questions ask about more than just colors – like what fraction of the arrows point up, or what fraction of the letters are vowels.

By default, scientific calculators, like regular ones, display fractions as decimals. So if you enter a simple fraction, such as 1/2, the display reads 0.5. Some – but not all – scientific calculators offer a feature that allows you to display fractions without making the conversion. Using this feature, you can enter a complex fraction and simplify it right on your calculator. Calculators with this feature also allow you to enter a number composed of an integer and a fraction, such as 1 1/4. If your calculator doesn't have this feature, you can use a workaround to manipulate fractionsCalculators that display fractions sometimes have a special mode, called Math mode, that you must first select before you can enter fractions. When the calculator is in Math mode, the word "math" appears at the top of the screen. Once you have selected this mode (if necessary), look for a button with two boxes, one black and one white, arranged on top of each other with a horizontal line between them. This is the fraction button. On some models, the button may show x/y or a b/c. Pressing this button enables the fraction feature. (Source: sciencing.com)

Use

A variation on the above method is to break the calculation into two parts, and use the memory functions of the calculator to store the result of the first part. The calculator memory is particularly useful when you want to calculate the values of several expressions that have a common part. This common part need be entered only once and its value reused several times subsequently. For example, rewriting the formula for the volume of wood contained in a log as.

In this section we consider several different approaches that can be used to evaluate this and other more complex expressions using different functions on your calculator. While the first method – considered in Activity 9 – is probably the most straightforward for this relatively simple expression, it is useful to see how you might use other calculator functions when you are faced with more complicated expressions to evaluate. When describing how to use various calculator functions, this guide gives the exact keys that you need to press using the symbols shown on the keys. This is known as a ‘key sequence’. If the key sequence accesses the second function of a key, or a function from a menu, the name of this function will be given in brackets at the appropriate point in the key sequence. Names in brackets are thus not keys that you press but simply describe the function that is accessed using the previous key sequence. For example, to turn off the calculator, press (Source: www.open.edu)

 

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