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A Fractional Notation of 45

A Fractional Notation of 45

Fractional Notation of 45:

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Sitting on the outskirts of a rapidly-growing startup with 50,000+ accounts and 30 million+ registrations, I’ve realized that email copywriting is, at least to my detriment, not just about email copywriting. It’s about copywriting in general.

Math

Do you see a shortcut to find the equivalent fraction? Notice that [latex]0.8=\frac{8}{10}[/latex] and [latex]0.05=\frac{5}{100}[/latex]. The least common denominator of [latex]\frac{8}{10}[/latex] and [latex]\frac{5}{100}[/latex] is [latex]100[/latex]. By multiplying the numerator and denominator of [latex]\frac{0.8}{0.05}[/latex] by [latex]100[/latex], we ‘moved’ the decimal two places to the right to get the equivalent fraction with no decimals. Now that we understand the math behind the process, we can find the fraction with no decimals like this: Reducing a fraction may seem unnecessary when you're converting a decimal. But it's important if you're going to use the fraction in a math problem. If you're adding two fractions, you may even need to reduce or change both fractions so they have a common denominator. (Source:

The following video illustrates the notion of fractions as numbers by providing a brief overview of the development of fractions as part of the real number system. Before you watch the clip it may be useful for you to recall the meaning of the following terms "natural" number and "integer" by clicking on the following link Whole Numbers and Integers from Math Is Fun - Maths Resources. Sometimes it's useful to convert one kind of number into another. For example, it's much easier to add 1/4 and 0.5 if you turn 0.5 into a fraction. Learning how to convert fractions, decimals, and percents will also help you as you learn more advanced math. You will often see an alternative notation in maths books, where two numbers a and b are congruent or equivalent (≡) if, when divided by a given number, the modulus n , they have the same remainder: (Source: www.maths.surrey.ac.uk)

 

 

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