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A 7 Out of 12 Percentage

A 7 Out of 12 Percentage

7 Out of 12 Percentage

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A database is a database. They may be alike, but that doesn’t mean they’re the same.

Example

Other than being helpful with learning percentages and fractions, this tool is useful in many different situations. You can find percentages in almost every aspect of your life! Anyone who has ever been to the shopping mall has surely seen dozens of signs with a large percentage symbol saying "discount!". And this is only one of many other examples of percentages. They frequently appear, e.g., in finance where we used them to find an amount of income tax or sales tax, or in health to express what is your body fat. Keep reading if you would like to see how to find a percentage of something, what the percentage formula is, and the applications of percentages in other areas of life, like statistics or physics.

Percentages are sometimes better at expressing various quantities than decimal fractions in chemistry or physics. For example, it is much convenient to say that percentage concentration of a specific substance is 15.7% than that there are 18.66 grams of substance in 118.66 grams of solution (like in an example in percentage concentration calculator). Another example is efficiency (or its special case - Carnot efficiency). Is it better to say that a car engine works with an efficiency of 20% or that it produces an energy output of 0.2 kWh from the input energy of 1 kWh? What do you think? We are sure that you're already well aware that knowing how to get a percentage of a number is a valuable ability. (Source: www.omnicalculator.com)

Step

One area that often catches people out is year-on-year percentage increases. For example, Freya has £10 and each year this increases by 5%. How much will she have after 3 years? Some people can be tempted to add together the 5% for the 3 years i.e. 15% and multiply the £10 by 15% giving £11.5. This is incorrect. The correct way of approaching questions like this is to remember that EACH year the initial £10 increased by 5%. So at the end of year 1, Freya would have £10 x 1.05 = £10.5. At the end of year 2, she would have £10.5 x 1.05 = 11.025, and so on. It is important to add in each of these steps to arrive at the correct answer.

I've seen a lot of students get confused whenever a question comes up about converting a fraction to a percentage, but if you follow the steps laid out here it should be simple. That said, you may still need a calculator for more complicated fractions (and you can always use our calculator in the form below). (Source: visualfractions.com)

 

 

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