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8x8 math calculator

8x8 math calculator

8x8 math calculator

This tool provides an easy way to calculate with probabilities. There's a chance to access an interactive version.

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If you forgot how to find the area of a square, you're in the right place - this simple area of a square calculator is the answer to your problems. Whether you want to find the area knowing the square side or you need to calculate the side from a given area, this tool lends a helping hand. Read on and refresh your memory to find out what is the area of a square and to learn the formula behind the calculator. If you also need to calculate the area and diagonal of a square, check out this square calculator.The people above saying you need to break the 4 out of the parenthesis are correct this is why you distribute and simplify the expression. If you don’t you still have the 4 in parenthesis which means in 8÷2(4), you must solve the 2(4) first. Honestly why are people forgetting this? They get to stuck on putting an x between the 2 and 4 that they are dismissing the parenthesis without resolving. This is a calculator glitch that has encouraged the wrong answer.

In your explanation, you wrote that “a calculator is not going to say… ” …. that’s the problem right there! So many people rely on an object like a calculator, internet, etc for answers rather than using their brain/knowledge and working out the problem themselves! Stop! Put the calculator down and get your pen and paper out. Lord Jesus….Some people have a different interpretation. And while it’s not the correct answer today, it would have been regarded as the correct answer 100 years ago. Some people may have learned this other interpretation more recently too, but this is not the way calculators would evaluate the expression today. (Source: mindyourdecisions.com)

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The board has a squared shape, with its side divided into eight parts, in total it consists of 64 small squares. Assume that one small square has a side length equal to 1 in. The area of such square may be understood as the amount of paint necessary to cover the surface. So, from the formula for the area of a square, we know that area = a² = 1 in², and it's our unit of area in chessboard case (amount of paint). The area of 2x2 piece of the chessboard is then equal to 4 squares - so it's 4 in² and we need to use 4 times more "paint". Full chessboard area equals 84 in²: 8 in * 8 in from the formula or it's just 64 small squares with 1 in² area - so we need 64 times more "paint" than for one single square.“Special care is needed when interpreting the meaning of a solidus in in-line math because of the notational ambiguity in expressions such as a/bc. Whereas in many textbooks, “a/bc” is intended to denote a/(bc), taken literally or evaluated in a symbolic mathematics languages such as the Wolfram Language, it means (a/b)×c. For clarity, parentheses should therefore always be used when delineating compound denominators.” (http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Solidus.html)

The value of the determinant has many implications for the matrix. A determinant of 0 implies that the matrix is singular, and thus not invertible. A system of linear equations can be solved by creating a matrix out of the coefficients and taking the determinant; this method is called Cramer's rule, and can only be used when the determinant is not equal to 0. Geometrically, the determinant represents the signed area of the parallelogram formed by the column vectors taken as Cartesian coordinates. There are many methods used for computing the determinant. Some matrices, such as diagonal or triangular matrices, can have their determinants computed by taking the product of the elements on the main diagonal. For a 2-by-2 matrix, the determinant is calculated by subtracting the reverse diagonal from the main diagonal, which is known as the Leibniz formula. The determinant of the product of matrices is equal to the product of determinants of those matrices, so it may be beneficial to decompose a matrix into simpler matrices, calculate the individual determinants, then multiply the results. Some useful decomposition methods include QR, LU and Cholesky decomposition. For more complicated matrices, the Laplace formula (cofactor expansion), Gaussian elimination or other algorithms must be used to calculate the determinant. (Source: www.wolframalpha.com)

 

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