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40 Out of 50 Percentage:

40 Out of 50 Percentage:

40 Out of 50 Percentage

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Creating amazing content is hard. Even trying to just get started can prove difficult. That's why we rounded up 40 of the best pieces of content from across the web. If you're feeling uncertain, don't be afraid to look around.

Percentage

One area that often catches people out is year-on-year percentage increases. For example, Freya has £10 and each year this increases by 5%. How much will she have after 3 years? Some people can be tempted to add together the 5% for the 3 years i.e. 15% and multiply the £10 by 15% giving £11.5. This is incorrect. The correct way of approaching questions like this is to remember that EACH year the initial £10 increased by 5%. So at the end of year 1, Freya would have £10 x 1.05 = £10.5. At the end of year 2, she would have £10.5 x 1.05 = 11.025, and so on. It is important to add in each of these steps to arrive at the correct answer. The word "percentage" is often a misnomer in the context of sports statistics, when the referenced number is expressed as a decimal proportion, not a percentage: "The Phoenix Suns' Shaquille O'Neal led the NBA with a .609 field goal percentage (FG%) during the 2008–09 season." (O'Neal made 60.9% of his shots, not 0.609%.) Likewise, the winning percentage of a team, the fraction of matches that the club has won, is also usually expressed as a decimal proportion; a team that has a .500 winning percentage has won 50% of their matches. The practice is probably related to the similar way that batting averages are quoted.

Grammar and style guides often differ as to how percentages are to be written. For instance, it is commonly suggested that the word percent (or per cent) be spelled out in all texts, as in "1 percent" and not "1%". Other guides prefer the word to be written out in humanistic texts, but the symbol to be used in scientific texts. Most guides agree that they always be written with a numeral, as in "5 percent" and not "five percent", the only exception being at the beginning of a sentence: "Ten percent of all writers love style guides." Decimals are also to be used instead of fractions, as in "3.5 percent of the gain" and not "In the case of interest rates, a very common but ambiguous way to say that an interest rate rose from 10% per annum to 15% per annum, for example, is to say that the interest rate increased by 5%, which could theoretically mean that it increased from 10% per annum to 10.05% per annum. It is clearer to say that the interest rate increased by 5 percentage points (pp). The same confusion between the different concepts of percent(age) and percentage points can potentially cause a major misunderstanding when journalists report about election results, for example, expressing both new results and differences with earlier results as percentages. For example, if a party obtains 41% of the vote and this is said to be a 2.5% increase, does that mean the earlier result was 40% (since 41 = 40 × (1 + (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Step

One area that often catches people out is year-on-year percentage increases. For example, Freya has £10 and each year this increases by 5%. How much will she have after 3 years? Some people can be tempted to add together the 5% for the 3 years i.e. 15% and multiply the £10 by 15% giving £11.5. This is incorrect. The correct way of approaching questions like this is to remember that EACH year the initial £10 increased by 5%. So at the end of year 1, Freya would have £10 x 1.05 = £10.5. At the end of year 2, she would have £10.5 x 1.05 = 11.025, and so on. It is important to add in each of these steps to arrive at the correct answer.

I've seen a lot of students get confused whenever a question comes up about converting a fraction to a percentage, but if you follow the steps laid out here it should be simple. That said, you may still need a calculator for more complicated fractions (and you can always use our calculator in the form below). How to convert a given percentage into decimal? We will follow the following steps for converting a percentage into a decimal: Step I: Obtain the percentage which is to be converted into decimal Step II: Remove the percentage sign (%) and divide it by 100. (Source: www.math-only-math.com)

Divide

Although Ancient Romans used Roman numerals I, V, X, L, and so on, calculations were often performed in fractions that were divided by 100. It was equivalent to the computing of percentages that we know today. Computations with a denominator of 100 became more standard after the introduction of the decimal system. Many medieval arithmetic texts applied this method to describe finances, e.g., interest rates. However, the percent sign % we know today only became popular a little while ago, in the 20th century, after years of constant evolution. Do you have problems with simplifying fractions? The best way to solve this is by finding the GCF (Greatest Common Factor) of the numerator and denominator and divide both of them by GCF. You might find our GCF and LCM calculator to be convenient here. It searches all the factors of both numbers and then shows the greatest common one. As the name suggests, it also estimates the LCM which stands for the Least Common Multiple.

This is all nice, but we usually do not use percents just by themselves. Mostly, we want to answer how big is one number in relation to another number?. To try to visualize it, imagine that we have something everyone likes, for example, a large packet of cookies (or donuts or chocolates, whatever you prefer 😉 - we will stick to cookies). Let's try to find an answer to the question of what is 40% of 20? It is 40 hundredths of 20, so if we divided 20 cookies into 100 even parts (good luck with that!), 40 of those parts would be 40% of 20 cookies. Let's do the math: Let's go with something a bit harder and four times more delicious: 400 cookies! We're dividing them evenly, and every compartment gets four cookies. Cookies look smaller, but in our imagination, they are the same, just the drawer is much bigger! One percent of 400 is 4. How about 15 percent? It's 15 compartments times four cookies - 60 cookies. Our tummies start to ache a little, but it has never stopped us from eating more cookies! (Source: www.omnicalculator.co

 

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