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35 60 As a Percentage

35 60 As a Percentage

35 60 As a Percentage

Every day you will see headlines stating that 60% of companies use social media.

Percentage

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I've seen a lot of students get confused whenever a question comes up about converting a fraction to a percentage, but if you follow the steps laid out here it should be simple. That said, you may still need a calculator for more complicated fractions (and you can always use our calculator in the form below).

The percentage increase calculator above computes an increase or decrease of a specific percentage of the input number. It basically involves converting a percent into its decimal equivalent, and either subtracting (decrease) or adding (increase) the decimal equivalent from and to 1, respectively. Multiplying the original number by this value will result in either an increase or decrease of the number by the given percent. Refer to the example below for clarification. (Source: www.calculator.net)

Number

); hence the net change is an overall decrease by x percent of x percent (the square of the original percent change when expressed as a decimal number). Thus, in the above example, after an increase and decrease of x = 10 percent, the final amount, $198, was 10% of 10%, or 1%, less than the initial amount of $200. The net change is the same for a decrease of x percent, followed by an increase of x percent; the final amount is p(1 - 0.01x)(1 + 0.01x) = p(1 − (0.01x)

The word "percentage" is often a misnomer in the context of sports statistics, when the referenced number is expressed as a decimal proportion, not a percentage: "The Phoenix Suns' Shaquille O'Neal led the NBA with a .609 field goal percentage (FG%) during the 2008–09 season." (O'Neal made 60.9% of his shots, not 0.609%.) Likewise, the winning percentage of a team, the fraction of matches that the club has won, is also usually expressed as a decimal proportion; a team that has a .500 winning percentage has won 50% of their matches. The practice is probably related to the similar way that batting averages are quoted. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

 

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