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13 18 As a Percentage

13 18 As a Percentage

13 18 As a Percentage

Every day 12% of the world's population enters the workforce. That means about 1. 5 billion people are landing jobs each day, creating a yearly workforce of 5. 5 billion. If you’re not doing the addition, we did it for you. Just scroll down to see how big the workforce would be, at any given time, if we kept churning out new workers at a steady rate.

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This page explains how to calculate percentages, and provides some simple percentage calculators for you to use.

We will look at each of these in turn, providing examples of how to calculate them for you to practise, using the percentage calculators on the page if you wish. (Source: www.skillsyouneed.com)

Percentage

The percentage difference calculator is here to help you compare two numbers. Here we will show you how to calculate the percentage difference between two numbers and, hopefully, to properly explain what the percentage difference is as well as some common mistakes. In the following article, we will also show you the percentage difference formula. On top of that, we will explain the differences between various percentage calculators, and how data can be presented in misleading, but still technically true, ways to prove various arguments.

Now it is time to dive deeper into the utility of the percentage difference as a measurement. It should come as no surprise to you that the utility of percentage difference is at its best when comparing two numbers; but this is not always the case. We should, arguably, refrain from talking about percentage difference when we mean the same value across time. We think this should be the case because in everyday life we tend to think in terms of percentage change, and not percentage difference. (Source: www.omnicalculator.com)

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Now it is time to dive deeper into the utility of the percentage difference as a measurement. It should come as no surprise to you that the utility of percentage difference is at its best when comparing two numbers; but this is not always the case. We should, arguably, refrain from talking about percentage difference when we mean the same value across time. We think this should be the case because in everyday life we tend to think in terms of percentage change, and not percentage difference.

We have mentioned before how people sometimes confuse percentage difference with percentage change, which is a distinct (yet very interesting) value that you can calculate with another of our Omni Calculators. If you have read how to calculate percentage change, you'd know that we either have a 50% or -33.3333% change, depending on which value is the initial and which one is the final. (Source: www.omnicalculator.com)

Use

Now, if we want to talk about percentage difference, we will first need a difference, that is, we need two, non identical, numbers. Let's take, for example, 23 and 31; their difference is 8. Now we need to translate 8 into a percentage, and for that, we need a point of reference, and you may have already asked the question: Should I use 23 or 31? As we have not provided any context for these numbers, neither of them is a proper reference point, and so the most honest answer would be to use the average, or midpoint, of these two numbers.

"How is this even possible?" Thats a good question. The reason here is that, despite the absolute difference gets bigger between these two numbers, the change in percentage difference decreases dramatically. The two numbers are so far apart that such a large increase is actually quite small in terms of their current difference. Therefore, if we want to compare numbers that are very different from one another, using the percentage difference becomes misleading. If you want to avoid any of these problems, our recommendation to only compare numbers that are different by no more than one order of magnitude (two if you want to push it). If you want to learn more about orders of magnitude and what this term means, we recommend our scientific notation calculator. (Source: www.omnicalculator.com)

Question

Now, if we want to talk about percentage difference, we will first need a difference, that is, we need two, non identical, numbers. Let's take, for example, 23 and 31; their difference is 8. Now we need to translate 8 into a percentage, and for that, we need a point of reference, and you may have already asked the question: Should I use 23 or 31? As we have not provided any context for these numbers, neither of them is a proper reference point, and so the most honest answer would be to use the average, or midpoint, of these two numbers.

"How is this even possible?" Thats a good question. The reason here is that, despite the absolute difference gets bigger between these two numbers, the change in percentage difference decreases dramatically. The two numbers are so far apart that such a large increase is actually quite small in terms of their current difference. Therefore, if we want to compare numbers that are very different from one another, using the percentage difference becomes misleading. If you want to avoid any of these problems, our recommendation to only compare numbers that are different by no more than one order of magnitude (two if you want to push it). If you want to learn more about orders of magnitude and what this term means, we recommend our scientific notation calculator. (Source: www.omnicalculator.com)

 

 

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