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10 Key Calculator Tape

10 Key Calculator Tape

10 Key Calculator Tape

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Calculator

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See your total there on the screen now? I hope it shows —6 or 6.— depending how your calculator shows negative numbers. If it doesn't, start over at #1 above. The thing to remember here is that the calculator is going to ADD everything you input with the keys. So if you want to subract something, you have to enter it as a negative number or, if it's easier to remember, think of it as telling the machine you want to add into the total the number 6 you just entered, you want to add in the 5, take away or subtract the 9, and take away or subtract the 8. But you can't tell the machine to do these things with a number until you've entered the number itself!

Since its introduction in 1888, when it was patented by Williams Burroughs, the adding machine with tape has been a staple in office environments. However, they have become a dinosaur in the modern office, since hand-held tiny calculators can be found at every turn. Using an adding machine with tape provides advantages that you can't get from a hand-held machine, though. First, it lets you check your work immediately. Second, you have a permanent dated record of your work. Third, if working with long rows of numbers, you can do a side-by-side comparison. (Source: bizfluent.com)

Use

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This means that you can perform multiplication or division without affecting your addition and subtraction until you assign a positive or negative entry to the product of your multiplication/division. We understand this may appear complex for newcomers, but once you see this functionality in action, you'll be comfortable with using these functions in no time.

The largest keys on the keyboard should be those used most frequently. For the calculator, this certainly means the Plus Key, Minus Key, Total Key, Zero Key and Decimal Key. The actual size of these keys varies greatly from model to model and it is often what printing calculator users become comfortable with that determines what size is large enough. Small key tops, if used by you for popular functions, can hinder touch operation and therefore productivity. Each of our Monroe printing calculator product pages will show you what to expect in size for the various keys you routinely need to use. (Source: monroe-systems.com)

 

 

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