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10 10 10 calculator

10 10 10 calculator

10 10 10 calculator

The calculator below will compute the quotient by dividing the number to the right by the number to the left to give you the answer of the last digit of the dividend, the divisor, the number in between, and the final answer. This calculator will work on any field of two numbers.

Use

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I greatly appreciate the accuracy and flexibility of this calculator. It's very nice that I can use variables and nest functions, and the functions never seem to completely "zero out" due to a failure of precision like most calculators that are available for calculating hyperbolic trig functions. Especially since I am working with special relativity, where almost every single "daily life"-scale velocity is unbelievably small compared to the speed of light, so I am usually working with fractions on the order of a few billionths or smaller.

Similar to binary addition, there is little difference between binary and decimal subtraction except those that arise from using only the digits 0 and 1. Borrowing occurs in any instance where the number that is subtracted is larger than the number it is being subtracted from. In binary subtraction, the only case where borrowing is necessary is when 1 is subtracted from 0. When this occurs, the 0 in the borrowing column essentially becomes "2" (changing the 0-1 into 2-1 = 1) while reducing the 1 in the column being borrowed from by 1. If the following column is also 0, borrowing will have to occur from each subsequent column until a column with a value of 1 can be reduced to 0. Refer to the example below for clarification. (Source: www.calculator.net)

Power

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In scientific notation a large number is converted to an equivalent decimal number between 1 and 10, multiplied by 10 raised to some power. Very small numbers are converted to an equivalent decimal number between 1 and 10, multiplied by 10 raised to some negative power. In this example scientific notation calculation we're solving 1.225 × 10

Log base 10, also known as the common logarithm or decadic logarithm, is the logarithm to the base 10. The common logarithm of x is the power to which the number 10 must be raised to obtain the value x. For example, the common logarithm of 10 is 1, the common logarithm of 100 is 2 and the common logarithm of 1000 is 3. It is often used in various engineering fields, logarithm tables and handheld calculators. (Source: miniwebtool.com)

 

 

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