FutureStarr

1 Percent of 20 OR

1 Percent of 20 OR

1 Percent of 20

The average tech startup pivots 6. 4 times before achieving sustainable growth. But for the small percentage of startups that actually reach (or already have) sustainable growth, that number drops to just 1 in 20.

Multiply

. A real-world example could be: there are two girls in a group of five children. What's the percentage of girls? In other words, we want to know what's the ratio of girls to all children. It's 2 out of 5, or 2/5. We call the first number (2) a numerator and the second number (5) a denominator because this is a fraction. To calculate the percentage, multiply this fraction by 100 and add a percent sign.

As your maths skills develop, you can begin to see other ways of arriving at the same answer. The laptop example above is quite straightforward and with practise, you can use your mental maths skills to think about this problem in a different way to make it easier. In this case, you are trying to find 20%, so instead of finding 1% and then multiplying it by 20, you can find 10% and then simply double it. We know that 10% is the same as 1/10th and we can divide a number by 10 by moving the decimal place one place to left (removing a zero from 500). Therefore 10% of £500 is £50 and 20% is £100. (Source: www.skillsyouneed.com)

Divide

Do you have problems with simplifying fractions? The best way to solve this is by finding the GCF (Greatest Common Factor) of the numerator and denominator and divide both of them by GCF. You might find our GCF and LCM calculator to be convenient here. It searches all the factors of both numbers and then shows the greatest common one. As the name suggests, it also estimates the LCM which stands for the Least Common Multiple.

Although Ancient Romans used Roman numerals I, V, X, L, and so on, calculations were often performed in fractions that were divided by 100. It was equivalent to the computing of percentages that we know today. Computations with a denominator of 100 became more standard after the introduction of the decimal system. Many medieval arithmetic texts applied this method to describe finances, e.g., interest rates. However, the percent sign % we know today only became popular a little while ago, in the 20th century, after years of constant evolution. (Source: www.omnicalculator.com)

 

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