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Pound Cake Recipe:

Pound Cake Recipe:

Pound Cak

Pound Cakes are so named because originally they were made with one pound of butter, one pound of sugar, one pound of eggs, and one pound of flour. In France, a Pound Cake goes by the name Quatre Quarts, which means four quarters, referring to the quantities of the ingredients. While the Pound Cakes we make today often have different proportions from the original recipe and often contain baking powder or baking soda, they are still wonderfully rich, moist, and buttery with a lovely golden-brown crust.

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Perfect Pound Cak

Pound cake is like the little black dress of dessert. It’s elegant in its simplicity; you can dress it up or down; and it’s wonderful anytime, anywhere. My all-time favorite recipe comes from The Cake Bible by Rose Levy Beranbaum, a classic and essential cookbook for all bakers. While most traditional pound cake recipes call for equal weights of flour, sugar, eggs, and butter, Rose’s recipe incorporates milk, lots of extra butter, and a little baking powder. (Source:

Why Is It Called a Pound Cake?

This Moist & Easy Pound Cake Can Be Made Into so Many Epic Desserts

BUT don’t be misled…there is magic in the basics too. This pound cake recipe is the building block for a pretty epic strawberry shortcake. Macerated strawberries and whipped cream add extra moisture and sweetness that pairs beautifully with the dense crumb of traditional pound cake. Or imagine how INSANE French Toast would be made out of thin slices of this cake!? But, if you were able to ask my Grandpa, I think he would have taken a slice of this plain with his coffee over just about anything else.

Hi! I’m Shelly and I’m an addict. Of the buttercream sort. I started this site a few years ago as a way to justify my sugary, buttery obsession with desserts. It has worked out well for me so far because as it turns out you guys all love sugary, buttery desserts too! It feels good to know you're not alone, doesn’t it?

Www.once upon the Bowl of an Electric Mixer Fitted With the Paddle Attachment (or With a Hand Mixer), Place the Flour, Sugar, Baking Powder, and Salt. Mix on Low Speed for About 30 Seconds or Until Blended. Add the Butter and Half of the Egg Mixture. Mix on Low Speed Until the Dry Ingredients Are Moistened. Increase the Mixer Speed to Medium (high Speed If Using a Hand Mixer) and Beat for One Minute. Scrape Down the Sides of the Bowl. Add the Remaining Egg Mixture, in 2 Separate Additions, Beating About 30 Seconds After Each Addition to Combine. Do Not Over-Mix. (The Batter May Have a Slightly Curdled or Grainy Appearance -- That's Okay.) (Source:nachef.com)Ingredients:

â…“ cup butter, room temperature

This Pound Cake recipe uses a slightly different method to mix the batter. Instead of the more common 'creaming' method where the butter and sugar are beaten together first and then the eggs, followed by the flour and milk are added, this recipe uses what we call the 'one bowl' or 'quick method' (also known as a 'dump' cake). The most important thing to remember when using this 'one bowl' method is to have all the ingredients at room temperature and to make sure you follow the instructions on mixing. This method first mixes all the dry ingredients together and then room temperature butter, along with the liquid ingredients, are beaten into the batter. This method reduces the gluten formation in the flour thereby producing a densely textured cake with a soft and tender crumb.

You should really change the recipe to reflect what is said in the video. The recipe says that all items should be room temperature, I didn't do that with my eggs. It also says to cream the butter first then gradually add sugar. The recipe doesn't state to do this separately. I didn't realize that I had to watch the video first to make sure I was making this correctly...had I known that was a requirement maybe my pound cake would have turned out better. I'm a new baker so the abbreviated instructions really let me down.

This is one of the best pound cakes I've ever made. My 4 yr old loves pound cake and we made it for his birthday yesterday. It was not dry, nor was it crumbly. The texture was perfect. I had made this recipe a few months back and it was dry, but tried it again because I was out of milk (and promised my son a pound cake yesterday for his bday). I think for those people who said it was dry, they should watch the video and make sure they cream the sugar and butter for exactly 8 minutes. This gives the correct base for the cake resulting in a light fluffy texture. Real pound cake does not have baking soda or milk in the recipe...thats just a dense cake. Anyway, I also used room temperature brown eggs and cake flour. I was out of vanilla and did not increase the sugar. I added 2/3 cup of sour cream (after the eggs) for added flavor and sifted in the flour, adding it to the mix by 1/2 cup because s[filtered]fuls took too long. I also used my hand mixer and not a stand mixer. Hope this helps! (Source:

This is one of the best pound cakes I've ever made. My 4 yr old loves pound cake and we made it for his birthday yesterday. It was not dry, nor was it crumbly. The texture was perfect. I had made this recipe a few months back and it was dry, but tried it again because I was out of milk (and promised my son a pound cake yesterday for his bday). I think for those people who said it was dry, they should watch the video and make sure they cream the sugar and butter for exactly 8 minutes. This gives the correct base for the cake resulting in a light fluffy texture. Real pound cake does not have baking soda or milk in the recipe...that's just a dense cake. Anyway, I also used room-temperature brown eggs and cake flour. I was out of vanilla and did not increase the sugar. I added 2/3 cup of sour cream (after the eggs) for added flavor and sifted in the flour, adding it to the mix by 1/2 cup because s[filtered]fuls took too long. I also used my hand mixer and not a stand mixer. Hope this helps! (Source: www.marthastewart.com)

 

 

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