FutureStarr

Hummus Recipe

Hummus Recipe

What Is Hummus?

Just so we are all on the same page, let’s talk about what hummus is. Hummus is a delicious spread or dip made from chickpeas, tahini, lemon, and spices. It’s commonly eaten in the Middle East and the Mediterranean. Here in the United States, you can find store-bought versions at the grocery store, but we think you should skip those and make your own. Let me show you how! Using a food processor or a blender, combine all the ingredients. Add a little water if the mixture is too thick for your processor, or a tad to cook dry chickpeas: soak chickpeas in plenty of water overnight (water needs to be at least doubled the volume of chickpeas). When ready, drain chickpeas and place them in a medium-sized heavy cooking pot. Cover with water by about 2 inches. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 1 ½ to 2 hours. Drain well. Yield: Approximately 3 cups TasteWe’re all pretty attached to our own favorite hummus recipe,

To peel chickpeas (cooked or from a can): cover cooked chickpeas in hot water and add 1 ½ teaspoon baking soda. Leave for a few minutes. Take a handful of chickpeas and rub under running water to remove the skins. Place peeled chickpeas in a bowl. (Source:

How to cook dry chickpeas in a hurry for this recipe: In a large saucepan, combine 5 ounces (¾ cup) dried chickpeas and ½ teaspoon baking soda, and fill the pot with water. Bring the mixture to a boil over high heat and skim off the surface foam as needed. Continue boiling over medium-high, adding more water if you start running out, until the chickpeas are very mushy and falling apart, about 1 hour to 1 hour 15 minutes. Drain in a fine-mesh colander, rinse under cool running water, and drain well before using. Start the recipe at step 2. (Source: cookieandkate.com)

My second mission was to improve the texture of my hummus and make it as silky-smooth as possible, which ended up being a total recipe-testing rabbit hole. Turns out that the internet is full of opinions about exactly how to achieve the perfect creamy texture, most of which have to do with how to cook your chickpeas. So in the quest for killer hummus, I put on my Ali’s Test Kitchen hat and tried ’em all. From Solmonov’s famous method of soaking dried chickpeas overnight and then boiling them until they are overcooked in baking soda, to Epicurious’ shortened method of just boiling a can of chickpeas in water for 20 minutes, to Melissa Clark’s scratch Instant Pot hummus, to the Washington Post’s super-speedy method of pureeing the hummus for a full 3 minutes in the food processor, to various tips from around the internet to incorporate aquafaba, use a blender, and (ugh) individually peel every one of those little chickpeas — well, let’s just say it’s a good thing that Barclay and I love hummus because we’re nearly twenty batches in this month (and counting).

Do You Need to Peel the Chickpeas?

Another trick for the smoothest hummus is to remove the skins of each chickpea. We’ve done it. For one can of chickpeas, you’re looking at about ten minutes to remove all the skins. We really didn’t want to add the extra time to our hummus recipe below, but just to make sure, we tried it both ways — skinless chickpeas and chickpeas right out of the can. (Source: www.inspiredtaste.net)

How Do You Thicken Hummus?

If , for some reason, you ended up using more liquid than you should have or if you still want a thicker consistency, you can add a bit more tahini. And if you chill the hummus for an hour or so before adding any garnish, that should help as well. People of the Mediterranean, myself included of course, eat hummus with pita bread. And if we're doing a more modern thing, then maybe pita chips. But there are many ways to serve and enjoy this tasty dip. Hummus is, of course, ideal dipping material, but it can also be dressed up into a proper meal – Ottolenghi's recipe in Plenty has it with broad bean paste, hard-boiled eggs and raw onion (not "the lightest affair, but … completely delicious"), while the recipe in the Moro cookbook includes a sweetly spiced topping of minced lamb, caramelised onions and pine nuts, which I urge you to try. Even if you're serving it as a dip, a sprinkling of paprika, or (my own personal favorite), lemony za'atar, sets it well apart from the common supermarket herd.

5. Tip into a bowl, and when ready to serve, drizzle with olive oil, garnish with the reserved chickpeas and sprinkle with paprika or za'atar if using.

Best Hummus Recip

While I’ve posted many hummus variations here on the blog and even more in my first cookbook, I’ve recently gotten requests for my go-to classic homemade hummus recipe. Even though I think it’s fun to mix veggies into all kinds of chickpea dips (see below for many of those options), this is the hummus recipe I make when I’m craving that classic tahini-forward, ultra-creamy, smooth dip, just like the kind I enjoy at a good Middle Eastern restaurant. It’s simple to make – with just 5 minutes of prep, 7 basic ingredients transform into delicious homemade hummus. It’s lusciously smooth, with a bright lemon flavor and a little kick from garlic. Whether you enjoy it with fresh veggies, slather it on a sandwich, or scoop it up with wedges of pita, I hope you love it as much as I do!

Garlic. I use one fresh garlic clove in my basic recipe, but you could also swap in 2 roasted garlic cloves for a caramelized taste.

In a high-speed blender, place the chickpeas, tahini olive oil, lemon juice, garlic, and salt. Use the blender baton to blend until very smooth, adding water as needed to blend, and/or to reach your desired consistency.

Alright, first let’s back up for a sec — just exactly what is hummus? In case this is new to you, it’s a classic dish from the Middle East and Mediterranean made primarily from chickpeas (a.k.a. garbanzo beans), tahini (ground sesame paste), lemon juice, garlic and salt. Various countries add in their own staple ingredients, like ground cumin. And of course, if you look for hummus at any American grocery store nowadays, there are about a million variations that you can buy. It can be served warm or cold, as a dip or as a spread, and most of all, it’s downright delicious. But a search of a local ethnic market for good hummus also yielded a somewhat confusing range of options. I was the only one in the store that was an expert on hummus, and I’m a pretty good judge of all things chickpea. But I figured there had to be some rules at play here, so I asked around. The first tip I was given was that hummus is actually very easy to make at home.

 

Related Articles