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How to cook a turkey crown

How to cook a turkey crown

How to cook a turkey crown

To cook a turkey, first you need to get your day-old turkey from the supermarket's freezer. The turkey needs to be thawed before you can cook it. Next, soak your turkey in cool water for about 30 minutes, allowing the bath to reach room temperature as well. Now, you're ready to prepare the bird for roasting. In a frying pan, put the butter or oil on medium heat.Turkey has all the nutritional benefits of chicken but with a slightly lower fat content. This is good for health, but does mean that the flesh can be on the dry side. Older turkey recipes advise basting a turkey regularly to keep the meat moist, but newer recipes suggest cooking the turkey more quickly while using dry brines – leaving the turkey in salt and flavouring overnight. This method draws moisture out, then the turkey reabsorbs it, which seasons the meat and dries out the skin for a crisp finish in the oven. Turkey has all the nutritional benefits of chicken but with a slightly lower fat content. This is good for health, but does mean that the flesh can be on the dry side. Older turkey recipes advise basting a turkey regularly to keep the meat moist, but newer recipes suggest cooking the turkey more quickly while using dry brines – leaving the turkey in salt and flavouring overnight. This method draws moisture out, then the turkey reabsorbs it, which seasons the meat and dries out the skin for a crisp finish in the oven.

TURKEY

Turkey has all the nutritional benefits of chicken but with a slightly lower fat content. This is good for health, but does mean that the flesh can be on the dry side. Older turkey recipes advise basting a turkey regularly to keep the meat moist, but newer recipes suggest cooking the turkey more quickly while using dry brines – leaving the turkey in salt and flavouring overnight. This method draws moisture out, then the turkey reabsorbs it, which seasons the meat and dries out the skin for a crisp finish in the oven. Turkey has all the nutritional benefits of chicken but with a slightly lower fat content. This is good for health, but does mean that the flesh can be on the dry side. Older turkey recipes advise basting a turkey regularly to keep the meat moist, but newer recipes suggest cooking the turkey more quickly while using dry brines – leaving the turkey in salt and flavouring overnight. This method draws moisture out, then the turkey reabsorbs it, which seasons the meat and dries out the skin for a crisp finish in the oven.

The small change of simply seasoning your turkey up to 2 days in advance makes a massive difference and actually cuts down on the amount of salt you need. Known as dry-brining, this technique involves salting your turkey (inside and out) in advance. The salt has a chance to work its way into the protein, season it evenly from within and start to break it down, tenderise the meat and allows it to retain its succulence as it roasts. By seasoning in advance, the whole bird is evenly seasoned and you don’t have to heavily season just before roasting. The same applies to all birds but as they are smaller only a day in advance is needed.Position your oven rack on the lowest rung and set the oven to 350°F. Some recipes have you start roasting the turkey at a high temperature for a brief period before lowering the heat for the duration. The belief is that the high heat “sears” the bird and the low heat gently roasts, yielding a bird that’s more moist and succulent, but we haven’t found that this makes a huge difference. Plus, the skin gets browned very quickly (often too quickly). Steady heat means not having to check the oven so frequently, leaving you free to do other things, like prep your mashed potatoes. (Source: www.epicurious.com)

 

 

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