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Guanciale

Guanciale

Guanciale

Time

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Guanciale is a type of cured pork jowl known for being more flavorful and fatty than regular pork jowl meat. It is also higher in collagen, which is thought to promote aging, plump your skin, and reduce wrinkles. It has been said to be one of the most vital ingredients for making lardo.

Guanciale may be cut and eaten directly in small portions, but often used as an ingredient in pasta dishes (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Dish

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Looking at the above, it's clear that guanciale is a dish that requires a lot of time to prepare. However, when you take the time to make the proper preparations, you usually aren't disappointed by the results. When you know how to properly cook guanciale, you'll never want to eat another pork chop again!

The breakfast staple that Americans are used to is a bit uncommon in Italy. Bacon can come from several areas of the pig. Lean cuts are from the back, while meatier cuts are taken from the side of the pig or the belly. Belly meat is streaked with fat, and when it’s fried it curls up and turns delectably crispy. In the United States, it is specifically the cured meat from the pig’s belly. Italians make another type of cured meat from pork belly. (Source: www.livitaly.com)

Cook

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Buono da Mangiare!

Taken from the cheek of a pig, guanciale is a rich, fatty piece of meat that often gets cured before it's used. Guanciale is mainly found in Italian pasta dishes from central Italy in areas such as Umbria and Lazio. Two of the most common or well-known dishes that feature guanciale. Include spaghetti alla carbonara and amatriciana, which both include some of the meat in the sauce. The flavor of the guanciale permeates each bite and gives the sauce an umami richness and a bit of a salty, velvety backbone. (Source: www.thespruceeats.com)

Italian

Italian cuisine is rich and diverse with many regional cuisines. Italian cuisine has many styles and regional varieties: Roman, Sicilian, Milanese, Neapolitan, Tuscan, Ligurian and Sardinian cuisine to name just a few. Traditional Italian fare is made up of pastas and simple savory dishes. That are typically cooked at high temperatures in large amounts of wine, stock and oil.

 

 

 

 

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