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Cook a turkey

Cook a turkey

Cook a turkey

My hope is to squash any fears or insecurities you might have about cooking a perfect, beautiful Thanksgiving Turkey. This method is completely fuss-free and EASY. There’s no brining or basting the turkey, no cooking it upside down, or anything weird. Instead I prefer seasoning the bird all over with a salt rub — technically, a dry brine — and letting it sit for a few days, or even hours, before roasting. It’s much easier to keep a salted turkey in the fridge rather than having to figure out where to store a bird covered in liquid.Instead I prefer seasoning the bird all over with a salt rub — technically, a dry brine — and letting it sit for a few days, or even hours, before roasting. It’s much easier to keep a salted turkey in the fridge rather than having to figure out where to store a bird covered in liquid.

EASY

I made this turkey last year for my first ever attempt at Thanksgiving. It was so juicy that we barely recognized it as turkey! One tip for those who don't have a roasting rack and want to avoid the sogginess that is mentioned, place the turkey on top of whole carrots. The carrots will keep the turkey above the broth, and this way you can use a disposable aluminum roaster. I followed the recipie to a T last year, but this year I'm going to add some citrus in the cavity and some lemon zest and parsely to the butter. This is a great recipie as is, but it is so simple that its easy to add your own flair. The broth in the bottom is really what gets the amazing results! Read More.I made this turkey last year for my first ever attempt at Thanksgiving. It was so juicy that we barely recognized it as turkey! One tip for those who don't have a roasting rack and want to avoid the sogginess that is mentioned, place the turkey on top of whole carrots. The carrots will keep the turkey above the broth, and this way you can use a disposable aluminum roaster. I followed the recipie to a T last year, but this year I'm going to add some citrus in the cavity and some lemon zest and parsely to the butter. This is a great recipie as is, but it is so simple that its easy to add your own flair. The broth in the bottom is really what gets the amazing results!

Note: if you are using a remote thermometer (or two) to gauge the temperature of the turkey while it cooks, it's easiest to find the right place to insert the probe when the turkey is breast side UP. So eyeball where you think the thermometer probe(s) should go first, before placing the turkey breast side down in the pan. Once the turkey is breast side down in the pan, insert the probes into the thickest and coldest parts of the breast and/or thighs, making sure the probe is not touching the metal rack or pan. If you only have one remote thermometer, put it in the breast.Carving your turkey properly is the perfect finishing touch. Not only does it make it easier for people to eat, but it is the perfect way to publicly demonstrate your new-found turkey prowess! But carving a turkey—with all its nooks and crannies, the legs, wings, and breasts on the ribcage—is not like carving a tenderloin. It takes a strategic plan. (Source: blog.thermoworks.com)

juice

Place turkey in the oven, and pour 2 cups turkey stock into the bottom of the roasting pan. Baste all over every 30 minutes with the juices on the bottom of the pan. Whenever the drippings evaporate, add stock to moisten them, about 1 to 2 cups at a time. Remove aluminum foil after 2 1/2 hours. Roast until a meat thermometer inserted in the meaty part of the thigh reads 165 degrees F (75 degrees C), about 4 hours. You want a resulting temperature of 165°F for the white meat (breast) and 165°F to 170°F for the dark meat (thighs and legs). The temperature of the bird will continue to rise once you take it out of the oven, so take the turkey out of the oven when the temperature reading for the breast is 155°F to 160°F, and for the thigh is 160°F to 165°F. If you don't have a meat thermometer, spear the breast with a knife. The turkey juices should be clear, not pink.

While exposed to the intense heat of an oven, smoker or fryer, turkey meat’s protein fibers shorten, shrink and contract, expelling out the water they’ve retained. During the rest, these protein fibers have a chance to relax and reabsorb some of the juices that are lost. A turkey carved and served without resting will spill more of its juices onto the cutting board and not be as moist. Don’t be under the illusion that when you remove the turkey from the oven it stops cooking. The residual heat will continue to cook the bird, giving the juices time to travel back throughout the meat, meaning a juicier bird all round. Piping hot meat is not a clever thing – warm, juicy meat, hot gravy and hot plates is the holy grail Roast the turkey about 2 1/2 hours, or until the juices run clear when you cut between the leg and the thigh. Remove the turkey to a cutting board and cover with aluminum foil; let rest for 20 minutes. (Source: www.foodnetwork.com)

 

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