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A In and Out Burger

A In and Out Burger

In and Out Burger

Now, you might ask yourself, “What the heck is an In and Out Burger? ” Well, it's one of three hamburger chains in southern California and the western United States. However, many people outside southern California had not heard of In and Out Burger before founder Harry Snyder opened his first location in 1948. Snyder, who said he came up with the idea after working nights, it was opened in the 1940s with a single tiny hamburger stand.

Food

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The first In-N-Outs had a common design, placing the kitchen "stand" between two lanes of cars. The "front" lane is nearest the street and the "back" lane away from the street. This location design is known as a double drive-thru. A metal awning provides shade for several tables for customers desiring to park and eat, but there is no indoor dining. A walk-up window faces the parking area. These restaurants store food and supplies in a separate building, and it is not uncommon for a driver to be asked to wait a moment while employees carry supplies to the kitchen across the rear lane.

Today's typical location has an interior layout that includes a customer service counter with registers in front of a kitchen and food preparation area. There are separate storage areas for paper goods (napkins, bags, etc.) and "dry" food goods (potatoes, buns, etc.), as well as a walk-in refrigerator for perishable goods (lettuce, cheese, spread, etc.), and a dedicated meat refrigerator for burger patties. The customer area includes an indoor dining room with a combination of booths, tables, and bar-style seating. Outside seating is usually available as well, with tables and benches. Most newer restaurants contain a one-lane drive-through. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Like other fast-food chains, In-N-Out uses roadside billboards that attract customers to the nearest location. Billboard ads display an image of the trademarked Double-Double burger. The chain uses short radio commercials, often limited to the song "In-N-Out, In-N-Out. That's what a hamburger's all about." Television commercials, which are less common, feature the hamburger's visual appeal. In-N-Out seldom uses celebrities in ads, although John Cleese and John Goodman have voiced radio spots. In the past, the Snyders also sponsored Christmas music programming with voice-overs expressing the meaning of the holiday. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Fast

Like other fast-food chains, In-N-Out uses roadside billboards that attract customers to the nearest location. Billboard ads display an image of the trademarked Double-Double burger. The chain uses short radio commercials, often limited to the song "In-N-Out, In-N-Out. That's what a hamburger's all about." Television commercials, which are less common, feature the hamburger's visual appeal. In-N-Out seldom uses celebrities in ads, although John Cleese and John Goodman have voiced radio spots. In the past, the Snyders also sponsored Christmas music programming with voice-overs expressing the meaning of the holiday.

The chain's image has also made it popular in some unusual ways. For example, In-N-Out is still considered acceptable in some areas with strong opposition to corporate food restaurants, such as McDonald's. Anyone with a business interest in San Francisco's Fisherman's Wharf district said they opposed every other fast-food chain except In-N-Out because they wanted to maintain the flavor of family-owned, decades-old businesses in the area, with one saying locals would ordinarily "be up in arms about a fast-food operation coming to Fisherman's Wharf", but "this is different". (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

In-N-Out was one of the very few restaurant chains given a positive mention in the book Fast Food Nation. The book commended the chain for using natural and fresh ingredients and for looking after the interests of employees regarding pay and benefits. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Hulking tractor-trailers emblazoned with the fast-food chain’s familiar logo navigate the narrow asphalt arteries of a sprawling warehouse complex that serves as In‑N‑Out’s distribution center, a short distance from the spot where Harry and Esther Snyder opened their long-since-shuttered first stand back in 1948. A tour bus contingent of Asian visitors, apparently fresh from lunch at an In‑N‑Out on the edge of the complex, is now milling about in front of the In‑N‑Out University training center, snapping photos and perusing the classic car-themed memorabilia in the company gift store. The visitors’ fascination with a regional hamburger chain is no surprise, considering that over the years, In‑N‑Out—whose freshly-made, premium burgers are famously craved by Hollywood luminaries and rock stars—has become an enduring part of California’s mystique. (Source: www.orangecoast.com)

The tourists are face to face with the mysterious Lynsi Snyder, who has weathered personal tragedies and legal strife to helm the iconic company her grandparents founded. As president of In‑N‑Out, Snyder oversees an empire of nearly 300 restaurants in five states, staffed by some 17,000 employees, about 25 percent of whom are full-time. She’s taken on the responsibility of guiding a company that has survived and thrived for more than six decades despite an assortment of competitors, ranging from multinational giant McDonald’s to scores of upstarts that have tried to imitate In‑N‑Out’s minimalistic but high-quality version of fast food. If flipping burgers can be likened to art, Snyder’s task is similar to that of an expert assigned to restore a Rembrandt. She must preserve and nurture In‑N‑Out in a 21st century marketplace far removed and vastly different from its origins—and somehow do it without changing an operation built on familiarity. (Source: www.orangecoast.com)

When Harry and Esther Snyder opened their first hamburger stand after World War II, their business plan was to sell a few simple, inexpensive menu items made from the best, freshest ingredients they could obtain, and to prepare them meticulously by hand, so that they tasted as good as possible. According to business journalist Stacy Perman’s 2009 book on the company, Harry Snyder also came up with one big technological innovation that helped create the fast-food industry: the speakerphone for drive-through windows, which he had to show customers how to use when he introduced it in 1948. (Jack in the Box, the second company to use an intercom, added it three years later; McDonald’s first drive-through speaker didn’t arrive until 1975.) (Source: www.orangecoast.com)

In N Out doesn’t need to cut down their wait times or make it more convenient for you. I still don’t understand why anyone would wait that long for any fast food burger, In N Out is GOOD but not THAT GOOD. If you’re dumb enough to wait that long, it’s on you. They are doing great with their business model and they are sticking to it. (Source: apps.apple.com)

Line

The Snyders’ emphasis on quality and value was combined with slow, cautious expansion in which the parent company kept control of all the restaurants bearing its name, rather than selling franchises. When Harry Snyder died in 1976 and control of the company passed to his son and Lynsi’s uncle, Rich Snyder, the chain had just 18 restaurants, all in California. Nevertheless, burgeoning competitors such as McDonald’s, whose vaunted assembly-line kitchens churned out burgers, fries, and shakes with ruthless efficiency, failed to knock In‑N‑Out out of its profitable niche. More recently, the company has withstood challenges from upstarts such as Five Guys, a Virginia-based chain that rapidly expanded westward a few years ago onto In‑N‑Out’s turf. Industry analysts ascribe In‑N‑Out’s continuing success to its insistence on sticking to its original formula—and to the loyalty it has built among generations of customers as a result.

At 17, Lynsi yearned to become part of In‑N‑Out, and with her father’s blessing, sought a summer job in Redding. “I stood in line for two hours to apply because it was a brand-new store,” she recalls. The manager knew her identity, but to the rest of the staff, she was just another newbie. She started out like everyone else in prep work, coring tomatoes, peeling potatoes, and slicing onions. “Of course, I would cry every time,” she recalls with a laugh. Nevertheless, “I was really excited to work there, because it was the family business. It was fun, and I thought it would make my dad happy.” (Source: www.orangecoast.com)

In-n-out Burger, fast food restaurant at Los Angeles Airport Los Angeles, USA - May 13, 2013: In-n-out Burger, fast food restaurant at Los Angeles Airport. Many cars are waiting in line to be served in drive-through part of restaurant. in n out burger stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images (Source: www.istockphoto.com)

In-n-out Burger, fast food restaurant at Los Angeles Airport Los Angeles, USA - May 13, 2013: In-n-out Burger, fast food restaurant at Los Angeles Airport. Many cars are waiting in line to be served in drive-through part of restaurant. in n out burger stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images (Source: www.istockphoto.com)

Fast Food Las Vegas, USA - February 15, 2015: Cars lining up at a Drive-Thru at In-N-Out burger in Las Vegas. In-N-Out Burgers, Inc. is a regional chain of fast food restaurants with locations in the American Southwest. in n out burger stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images (Source: www.istockphoto.com)

 

 

 

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