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Many teeth do humans have

Many teeth do humans have

Many teeth do humans have

Many teeth. Hundreds and hundreds. Most people would probably be surprised by the number, but there's always someone who must know the answer to an inquiry like "how many do humans have"? before it is asked. It's always a good idea to find out.

HUMAN

Molars are the large teeth located in the back of your mouth. Humans have six upper molars and six lower molars, totalling twelve molars! The first set of molars generally erupts around age six, the second set erupts around age 12, and the third set erupts around age 17-25. Out of all your teeth, your molars are the strongest and are used to grind up food so that it can be safely swallowed.

Cuspids / Canines: Cuspids, also known as canines, are the closest link between the human mouth and that of a carnivorous predator, like a tiger or wolf. Mirroring the pointed teeth we associate with predatory animals and vampires, these are the sharp, pointed teeth on either side of our incisors that are used to do exactly what they look like – tear into food and rip it apart. These pointed teeth usually come in permanently around the ten year mark, with the bottom cuspids arriving just before the upper cuspids. One feature of cuspids and canine teeth is the fact that they are our longest teeth, with a pointed end, and only one implanted root. Canines rip food, but their position on either side of the mouth help guide the mouth and other teeth into the best biting position. (Source: www.hitekdental.com.au)

COME

How many teeth do children have? Children have 20 baby teeth. That includes 10 teeth on the top and 10 teeth on the bottom. All 20 of them usually come in before the age of three and act as placeholders for the adult teeth that grow in after the baby teeth fall out. At about age six, most children begin to lose their baby teeth, which are then replaced with adult teeth. This process continues until kids reach their early teen years.

Cuspids / Canines: Cuspids, also known as canines, are the closest link between the human mouth and that of a carnivorous predator, like a tiger or wolf. Mirroring the pointed teeth we associate with predatory animals and vampires, these are the sharp, pointed teeth on either side of our incisors that are used to do exactly what they look like – tear into food and rip it apart. These pointed teeth usually come in permanently around the ten year mark, with the bottom cuspids arriving just before the upper cuspids. One feature of cuspids and canine teeth is the fact that they are our longest teeth, with a pointed end, and only one implanted root. Canines rip food, but their position on either side of the mouth help guide the mouth and other teeth into the best biting position. (Source: www.hitekdental.com.au)

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