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How to get rid of a cold sore inside your mouth

How to get rid of a cold sore inside your mouth

How to get rid of a cold sore inside your mouth

"Herpes simplex virus — the virus that causes cold sores — is incredibly contagious, and infection with the virus is really common," says Dr. Donald Brown, primary care practitioner at Houston Methodist. "In fact, more than 50% of adults in the U.S. are infected with the type of herpes virus that most commonly causes cold sores. Interestingly, however, most people who contract the virus never actually develop symptoms."Cold sores appear when a person’s immune system becomes stressed. The virus that causes the cold sore, HSV-1, still exists in repressed cells of the body. When the immune system reaches its threshold, the virus and the cells become active simultaneously, and the cold sore appears.

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"Herpes simplex virus — the virus that causes cold sores — is incredibly contagious, and infection with the virus is really common," says Dr. Donald Brown, primary care practitioner at Houston Methodist. "In fact, more than 50% of adults in the U.S. are infected with the type of herpes virus that most commonly causes cold sores. Interestingly, however, most people who contract the virus never actually develop symptoms."

However, there’s insufficient data to support the routine use of these complementary therapies in treating cold sores. They should be discussed with your doctor before use, and shouldn’t replace more well-known treatment modalities.Honey already has a reputation for helping wounds and skin injuries heal. Now, a recent study in the journal BMJ Open has found that kanuka honey, which comes from the manuka tree in New Zealand, could be useful for treating cold sores, too. (Source: www.healthline.com)

Sore

Cold sores are usually a symptom of the herpes simplex virus (HSV-1), though HSV-2 can also cause cold sores. When a person first contracts the virus, they will experience a breakout within just a few days. The initial breakout can be the worst, accompanied by a fever, sore throat, aches and pains, and Flare-ups can occur at any time and are triggered by things like stress, hormonal fluctuations, surgery, fevers, illness, or sun exposure. But while they can be unavoidable, there are a few things you can do to calm or shorten the duration of a cold sore outbreak.

Avoid triggers. This means that if you know a hot, sunny day at the beach or a lot of stress makes you break out in cold sores, try to stay out of those situations when you can. You may be able to stop it in its tracks, or at least keep it from getting worse. The virus also can spread to the eyes or the genitals. For example, if you rub your eyes after getting saliva from an infected person on your hands, or if you receive oral sex from someone who has cold sores. (Source: www.webmd.com)

 

 

 

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