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Germander

Germander

Germander

A fear of the dark. A fear of the unknown. All children experience this fear at some point in their young life, but scary dreams can have a lasting effect on the child’s sleeping patterns, nightmares, and general well-being. In the US, up to 10% of children suffer from chronic nightmares. This might seem like a very small number, but one must take into account the fact that 15% of American children suffer from sleep disorders.Germander is a semishrubby perennial grown for its attractive, fragrant foliage and flowers, which might be blue, pink, purple, or white depending on species. Tolerant of pruning, germander is a favorite plant for knot gardens where it can be sculpted into serpentine shapes. It’s also easily shaped into borders or low hedges or planted in rock gardens. Not interested in sculpting this plant? Plant it among perennials, where it will add evergreen color. Or pair it with other pollinator plants for a colorful combo that attracts winged visitors.

Germander

Pair germander with plants that thrive in its preferred growing conditions. Many species of germander are native to the Mediterranean, where full sun and well-drained, sandy soils are the norm. Select plants that thrive in these conditions, such as agave, anise hyssop (Agastache foeniculum), artemisia, blanket flower (Gaillardia), flax (Linum perenne), lavender (Lavandula spp.), and Russian sage (Perovskia atriplicifolia). Plant germander in well-drained soil and full sun (which promotes vigorous growth) or part shade (which slows growth). Most germander species tolerate dry conditions, making them ideal for xeriscape gardens. One exception: American germander (Teucrium canadense), which is native to North America, grows well in poorly drained soil such as that of rain gardens.Regarding pruning in general: The best time to prune this plant is right after flowering, because spent germander flowers give it an unkempt appearance. Pruning restores germander's structural presence in the garden. Pruning after flowering also encourages the plant to channel energy into creating new foliage.

If needed, remove a few inches of green, leafy growth (along with the flower stalks) to reduce plant size. Avoid pruning plants in fall as the new growth will be susceptible to winter damage.Teucrium cossonii majoricum is a low-growing groundcover just 4-6 inches tall, but it spreads 2-3 feet wide. The silver-gray foliage has a strong, fruity aroma, which is the source of its common name. It's also known as pineapple germander and Majorcan teucrium. It bears lavender-blue flowers in spring and fall with sporadic bloom throughout the summer.Similar species: Two varieties of this species have been recorded for Missouri, and they are difficult to tell apart. American germander has several characteristics in common with its mint-family relatives, such as the square stems, opposite leaves, and two-lipped flowers. But this is the only mint in our state with the unique corolla lobe configuration. (Source: mdc.mo.gov)

 

 

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