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Baptisia Tinctoria

Baptisia Tinctoria

Baptisia Tinctoria

When most Baptisias are done blooming, the Small Yellow Wild Indigo is in full flower, making it a great shrub-like perennial for a landscape setting. The small flowers produce just one seed per pod unlike other Indigos, which will produce many in each pod. Another common name in use: Yellow False Indigo. Baptisia tinctoria is one of the host plants of the Wild Indigo Duskywing skipper and the Clouded Sulphur butterfly.

Tinctoria

Typhoid is one of the most serious infectious bacterial diseases in third world countries. It is usually treated by traditional antibiotics but due to the appearance of antibiotic resistant strains physicians opt for phyto products and other alternative medicines for the treatment of typhoid. Baptisia, an extract from indigo plant root, has been proved to be highly effective ultradilute medicine for the treatment of typhoid; however, the mode of action of the ultradilute extract is uncertain. Due to the antigenic variations of Salmonella it seems to induce immuno system by activating both T and B cells by the formation of antibodies. This principle seems to be highly effective for the development of typhoid vaccine. ITIS taxonomy is based on the latest scientific consensus available, and is provided as a general reference source for interested parties. However, it is not a legal authority for statutory or regulatory purposes. While every effort has been made to provide the most reliable and up-to-date information available, ultimate legal requirements with respect to species are contained in provisions of treaties to which the United States is a party, wildlife statutes, regulations, and any applicable notices that have been published in the Federal Register. For further information on U.S. legal requirements with respect to protected taxa, please contact the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Widely distributed, Wild Indigo often increases in burnt fields. Some 15 other species are found in eastern North America, including numerous yellow species farther south and some white or creamy ones. Blue False Indigo (B.australis), which has upright racemes of blue flowers and sap that turns purple when exposed to air, has escaped from cultivation northward to New York and Vermont. The genus name, from the Greek baptizein ("to dye"), refers to the fact that some species are used as an inferior substitute for true indigo dye.When most Baptisias are done blooming, the Small Yellow Wild Indigo is in full flower, making it a great shrub-like perennial for a landscape setting. The small flowers produce just one seed per pod unlike other Indigos, which will produce many in each pod. Another common name in use: Yellow False Indigo. Baptisia tinctoria is one of the host plants of the Wild Indigo Duskywing skipper and the Clouded Sulphur butterfly. (Source: www.prairiemoon.com)

 

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