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Young m a

Young m a

Young m a

Young m a, a live-music platform focused on African-American youth, released a commercial in January 2017 that garnered the attention of the entire country.Katorah Marrero, popularly known by her pseudo name Young M.A, is an American lyricist, buzzing rapper and YouTube star. She started rapping at a corner store of Brooklyn at the age of 9. Young M.A was offered a character role as Freda Gatz in the American drama series ‘Empire’ but she decline the offer as she wanted to pursue her career as a rapper. M.A is famous in the music industry for her hit single ‘Ooouuu’ and ‘Hot Sauce’ which have adult video and lyric content. Young specializes in Underground Rap and Hardcore Rap genre of music. She has been appreciated by rapper 50 Cent who stated in his Instagram account that ‘M.A’s music was real Tuff’. Young was honoured as the Forbes ‘Hip-Hop Cash Princes’ of 2017 for her outstanding lyrics and rapping style. M.A from her childhood was attracted to girls but she came out public about being a lesbian when she was 18 years of age. Since then, she has often addressed ‘the lesbian topic’ positively through rap music and has been able to break some taboos.

YOUNG

The Hyundai Sonata is a flex. A midsize economy sedan in a gleaming, recently washed hue the manufacturer calls “Quartz White Pearl,” it’s the kind of car you could easily lose in the parking lot of a shopping mall. Unfancy. Foreign, yes, but not even close to the litany of bespoke Italian whips that populate the lyrics and videos of so many rappers on the radio. It’s the day after Christmas, and this is how Young M.A pulls up to her grandma’s house, on a tree-lined block in Crown Heights, Brooklyn: in a vehicle that embodies, as M.A is prone to emphasizing in both conversation and her lyrics, that she really is just “regular.” Riding shotgun is Tori Brixx, the model/DJ, makeup-free and serene. The energy all comes from the young rapper, who bounds out of the driver’s side in a denim jacket and Jordans, grinning, with confidence emanating from her gait. They file into her grandma’s white-slatted row house, where a wreath decorated with a little wooden snowman hangs from the door. M.A’s mom, Latasha, heads downstairs, earrings jangling, offering greetings and a booming laugh. A friendly taupe pitbull named Mula and matching cat called Sapphire amble out for ear scratches. M.A asks her mother to fix her a plate of leftovers. As “regular” goes, it’s as average as family holiday time can be: good feelings, hugs, morning-after craving for mac and cheese. Everyone’s dressed down, except for M.A’s beautiful grandma, Cynthia, who has on a royal purple kaftan with beads at the neckline.

Funkmaster Flex broke “OOOUUU,” M.A’s vital, cheeky, punchline-laden single, not long after she self-released the song and its mobbed-up music video in May 2016, a worthy followup to 2015’s excellent Sleep Walkin mixtape. Flex’s influence in New York led to national radio, which led to Beyoncé Instagramming the track on her birthday, which led to Young M.A opening up for the iconic singer at New Jersey’s 82,000-seat MetLife Stadium, where the New York Giants play. It was Young M.A’s first show outside a club; now her video has passed 160 million views. Labels called, and Empire tried to cast her; she rebuffed them all, trusting her instincts. In October, the same month as the Beyoncé show, “OOOUUU” broke into the Billboard Hot Rap Songs charts and peaked at No. 3. M.A was the first woman solo artist to land on the chart all year, and has since reached 19 on the Hot 100, for all genres. Rap radio’s doors, long closed to rappers who are gay and out — despite constant and decades-long rumors about who may or may not be in the closet — opened at long last, for an aggressive, appealing, masc-presenting lesbian whose sexual identity is just one dimension to her skills as a musician and showperson. It is to Young M.A’s credit, and to the credit of an ever-progressive generation, that she is nonchalant about her sexuality. Hip-hop media has often otherized queer-identifying rappers, defining them by their queerness first, from late-’90s Bay Area trans pioneer Katastrophe to more recent stars like Le1f and Cakes da Killa. But for once, the mainstream has made room for someone to just be. The “M.A,” she tells me, stands for “Me, Always.” (Source: www.thefader.com)

 

 

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