FutureStarr

Will Sasso

Will Sasso

Will Sasso

Will, or “That Mitchell Guy,” as he’s better known, is a huge part of what’s happening in this podcasting world. Onstage at comedy temples like The Comedy Store, he's set the standard for what good, honest standup comedy is supposed to sound like. His podcast has a different focus: each video features a mostly younger audience and features stories from the stage.

Sasso

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A popular comic talent on North American television since the early 1990s, Will Sasso gained his widest audience as one of the most versatile performers on the sketch comedy series "MADtv" (Fox, 1995-2008), which led to a career in feature films. Sasso's larger-than-life persona made him ideal for lampooning such figures as Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, as well as actors Robert De Niro and Chris Farley, among others. The series afforded him guest shots on various other shows, as well as small roles in comedy features, including Christopher Guest's acclaimed mockumentary "Best in Show" (2001). After leaving "MADtv" in 2001, Sasso floated between small screen and feature assignments, though finding few quality projects until he was tapped to play Curly in the big-screen update of "The Three Stooges" (2012). Its somewhat surprising runaway success provided Sasso with not only his first substantial film role, but also a genuine and long-overdue shot at movie stardom.

Will Sasso was born in Ladner, British Columbia (a suburb of Vancouver), to a family of Italian descent. He grew up respecting comedy of all styles, thanks in part to an unhealthy relationship with the family television that began when Will was around two or three. With his mind consequently bent, Sasso decided at an early age to become an actor. At the age of fifteen, he landed his first agent and quickly began booking roles in television and film. Before moving from Vancouver to Los Angeles, Sasso starred for five seasons as the quirky teen, "Derek Wakaluk" on the award-winning Canadian dramatic series Madison (1993) allowing him to hone his acting and improvisational skills as well as providing him with enough money to buy a television of his own. (Source: www.amazon.com)

 

 

 

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