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What is a good resting heart rate

What is a good resting heart rate

What is a good resting heart rate

A resting heart rate can tell you a lot about your overall state of health. Learn how to take a holistic approach to your health with this tip in the infographic below!It's important to know what heart rate is healthy and normal at every age in your life. Your heart rate, or pulse, can guide you to discover dangerous health conditions that need expert care, such as some heart problems. But your normal resting heart rate changes throughout your life as you age. Read this guide to learn more about your pulse through every step of your life.

Heart

via GIPHY

You can measure your heart rate by finding your pulse. The pulsating rhythm of your blood—your pulse—matches the movements of your heart and indicates your heart rate. Using your middle and index finger, press firmly in an area of your body that has a pulse. One of the most common places to take your pulse is on the inside of your wrist. Other body parts that reveal your pulse include:

Your grandmother may have referred to your heart as "your ticker," but that nickname has proved to be a misnomer. A healthy heart doesn't beat with the regularity of clockwork. It speeds up and slows down to accommodate your changing need for oxygen as your activities vary throughout the day. What is a "normal" heart rate varies from person to person. However, an unusually high resting heart rate or low maximum heart rate may signify an increased risk of heart attack and death. (Source:www.health.harvard.edu)

Rate

Your grandmother may have referred to your heart as "your ticker," but that nickname has proved to be a misnomer. A healthy heart doesn't beat with the regularity of clockwork. It speeds up and slows down to accommodate your changing need for oxygen as your activities vary throughout the day. What is a "normal" heart rate varies from person to person. However, an unusually high resting heart rate or low maximum heart rate may signify an increased risk of heart attack and death.

Your maximum heart rate plays a major role in setting your aerobic capacity—the amount of oxygen you are able to consume. Several large observational studies have indicated that a high aerobic capacity is associated with a lower risk of heart attack and death. And a small controlled trial demonstrated that men and women with mild cognitive impairment who raised their aerobic capacity also improved their performance on tests of memory and reasoning. (Source: www.health.harvard.edu)

 

 

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