FutureStarr

Star Trek the Future

Star Trek the Future

Star Trek the Future

Celebrity astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson sits down with Nobel Prize winner Kip Thorne to discuss evidence of life in outer space, parallel universe theories within his own field, and Star Trek's optimistic futures.

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Let’s count off where things stand as Picard premieres. Sister show Star Trek: Discovery, which is set centuries before Picard, isn’t bad—but after two seasons, it’s still mostly playing to the Star Trek faithful who loved the franchise enough to pony up for CBS All Access. Meanwhile, an adult-oriented animated comedy called Star Trek: Lower Decks, by one of the creative minds behind Rick and Morty, is slated to premiere sometime this year. Apart from an animated children’s series that may still be in development at Nickelodeon, Star Trek’s future on television may live entirely behind the paywall at CBS All Access—even as the diversity of those projects makes it clear that a Star Trek series can be pretty much anything.

While in pursuit, Spock maroons Kirk on Delta Vega after he attempts mutiny. On the planet, Kirk encounters an older Spock (from the original timeline), who explains that he and Nero are from 2387. In the future, Romulus was threatened by a supernova, which Spock attempted to stop with an artificial black hole made of "red matter". However, his plan failed, resulting in Nero's family perishing along with Romulus, while both the Narada and Spock's vessel were caught in the black hole and sent back in time. Spock quickly found they were sent back 25 years apart, during which time Nero attacked the Kelvin, thus changing history and creating a parallel universe. After Spock's arrival, Nero stranded him on Delta Vega to watch Vulcan's destruction as revenge. Reaching a Starfleet outpost on Delta Vega, Kirk and the elder Spock meet Montgomery "Scotty" Scott, who helps them by devising a trans-warp beam system, allowing both him and Kirk to beam onto Enterprise while it is travelling at warp speed. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

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Pegg described Scotty as a positive Scottish stereotype, noting "Scots are the first people to laugh at the fact that they drink and fight a bit", and that Scotty comes from a long line of Scots with technical expertise, such as John Logie Baird and Alexander Graham Bell. Years before, Pegg's character in Spaced joked that every odd-numbered Star Trek film being "shit" was a fact of life. Pegg noted "Fate put me in the movie to show me I was talking out of my ass."

The boom in heavily serialized prestige television—and the way that the streaming era has encouraged binge-watching entire seasons at a time—has also trained viewers to treat every single episode of a series as equally important. But while the entirety of Star Trek: The Next Generation is available on Netflix right now, I can’t think of a worse way to watch it. There are 178 Next Generation episodes; many have aged poorly, many are inessential, and more than a few are awful. And while Next Generation’s episodic format also led to some of the most brilliant stories in the entire Star Trek franchise, it’s pretty archaic by modern standards. (Source: www.gq.com)

 

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