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But i'm a cheerleader

But i'm a cheerleader

But i'm a cheerleader

you're a kid. you're certainly not a dictator. you're not going to buy everything you want, you're not going to control your parents, and you're not going to change the world yet. but you can change your world. the power is in you.Seventeen-year-old Megan Bloomfield is a happy high school senior who loves cheerleading and is dating a football player Jared. She does not enjoy kissing Jared and prefers looking at her fellow cheerleaders. This combined with Megan's interest in vegetarianism and Melissa Etheridge lead her family and friends to suspect that she is in fact a lesbian. With the help of ex-gay Mike, they surprise her with an intervention. Following this confrontation, Megan is sent to True Directions, a reparative therapy camp which uses a five-step program to convert its campers to heterosexuality. Over the course of the program, Megan becomes friends with another girl at the camp, Graham, who though more comfortable being gay than Megan was forced to attend the camp at the risk of otherwise being disowned by her family.

Cheerleader

Megan is an all-American girl. She's a cheerleader and has a boyfriend, but she doesn't like kissing him very much, and she's pretty tactile with her cheerleader friends, and she only has pictures of girls up in her locker. Her parents and friends conclude that she *must* be gay and send her off to "sexual redirection" school, full of admittedly homosexual misfits, where she can learn how to be straight. Will Megan be turned around to successful heterosexuality, or will she succumb to her love for the beautiful Graham?

Audiences will finally be able to see the amusing musical bit in the director’s cut of “But I’m a Cheerleader,” available on demand starting Dec. 8 in honor of the film’s 20th anniversary. “I had cut it out because it didn’t really have a plot point, but I always loved it so much. One of the rules of making a film is you have to cut out your babies,” Babbit said. “I’m so happy it got back in the film.” And the movie helped launch the careers of Lyonne, Clea DuVall, and Melanie Lynskey, who got their breaks alongside a campy combination of seasoned actors: RuPaul, Moriarty, Bud Cort and Mink Stole. After “Cheerleader,” Babbit went on to direct the horror movie “The Quiet” and the comedy “Itty Bitty Titty Committee,” and episodes of dozens of popular TV shows, including “Russian Doll” (reuniting her with Lyonne), “Gilmore Girls,” “Malcolm in the Middle,” “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” “The L Word” and “Silicon Valley.”(Source:variety.com)

Natasha

Natasha Lyonne plays a cheerleader who isn't really into boys & doesn’t even like kissing her boyfriend. Her parents and friends get suspicious and she's sent off to a place where 'straight is great', a place that aims to de-gay people. The problem is that Clea Duvall is also there and the two fall in love. At True Directions, the boys wear blue, the girls wear pink and the pupils must pass a series of tests in order to graduate hence proving they’ve left their gay life behind. Although the actors are terrific - there are some pretty great performances from the ever-wonderful Clea DuVall and Natasha Lyonne, and I’ve always enjoyed Cathy Moriarty’s work, I must say - and thank god for it - the story hasn’t aged well. Natasha Lyonne plays a cheerleader who isn't really into boys & doesn’t even like kissing her boyfriend. Her parents and friends get suspicious and she's sent off to a place where 'straight is great', a place that aims to de-gay people.

The problem is that Clea Duvall is also there and the two fall in love. At True Directions, the boys wear blue, the girls wear pink and the pupils must pass a series of tests in order to graduate hence proving they’ve left their gay life behind. In Cheerleader, high schooler Megan Bloomfield (Natasha Lyonne) is more interested in listening to Melissa Ethridge than kissing boys, which spurs a panicked parental intervention and a roadtrip to True Directions, where Megan is forced to stay and pray the gay away with other homosexually “afflicted” teens. The heads of the camp, played by an out-of-drag RuPaul and a fiercely dom Cathy Moriarty, desperately employ everything in their toolbox to straighten out these teens for life—but, as with any teenager challenged by authority, one can guess the outcome. Bucking the “dead lesbian” trend by keeping her leads (including Clea DuVall, Babbit’s muse for the project) both in love and alive, Babbit ushered in a new wave of cutting-edge queer comedy for a generation in real need of a laugh. (Source: www.cinema.ucla.edu)

 

 

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