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A River Runs Through It

A River Runs Through It

A River Runs Through It

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The title of a movie may be the most famous opening line in American history. It says so much about the human condition and the absurdity of events in everyday life. In the mid-1930’s, screenwriter and playwright Robert Lewis Saul set on a journey to write the screenplay for a version of the movie and the novel that followed it.

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Growing up is a process of discovery. You discover what you like and what you don't, who you are, who you love….. A million questions asked. Some answered, some not. Hopefully with the few answered, you’re prepared to face the world. You may still be searching for answers throughout your life. And that’s how life goes. This is a story about three best friends growing up together in the same neighborhood, their friendship through high school, college and working life. This is one of the best youth dramas I have ever watched.

Lu Shiyi (Richard Zhang), an aspiring doctor who is hemophobic (fear of blood), tall, good looking and intelligent, is playful when it comes to his childhood friends. He doesn’t miss an opportunity in teasing Xia Xiaoju whom he has a penchant in getting his satisfaction out of her misery by pulling her ponytail, palm-turning her head (watch this https://www.bilibili.com/video/BV1hP4y1a7Uc), bear-hugging her under his giant armpit, bickering with her and calling her names (like Pig); he simply ‘roughs’ her up all the time like treating a boy and the bickering is non-stop. How Lu Shiyi treats Xia Xiaoju would have been called out in today's cancel culture, but here, his actions are cute, innocent and heart-warming. To me, that's how people, especially good friends, should interact with each other, sincerely and lovingly. (Source: mydramalist.com)

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My brother and I would have preferred to start learning how to fish by going out and catching a few, omitting entirely anything difficult or technical in the way of preparation that would take away from the fun. But it wasn't by way of fun that we were introduced to our father's art. If our father had had his say, nobody who did not know how to fish would be allowed to disgrace a fish by catching him. So you too will have to approach the art Marine and Presbyterian-style, and, if you have never picked up a fly rod before, you will soon find it factually and theologically true that man by nature is a damn mess. The four-and-a-half-ounce thing in silk wrappings that trembles with the underskin motions of the flesh becomes a stick without brains, refusing anything simple that is wanted of it. All that a rod has to do is lift the line, the leader, and the fly off the water, give them a good toss over the head, and then shoot them forward so they will land in the water without a splash in the following order: fly, transparent leader, and then the line—otherwise the fish will see the fly is a fake and be gone. Of course, there are special casts that anyone could predict would be difficult, and they require artistry—casts where the line can't go over the fisherman's head because cliffs or trees are immediately behind, sideways casts to get the fly under overhanging willows, and so on. But what's remarkable about just a straight cast—just picking up a rod with a line on it and tossing the line across the river?

Eventually, he introduced us to literature on the subject. He tried always to say something stylish as he buttoned the glove on his casting hand. "Izaak Walton," he told us when my brother was thirteen or fourteen, "is not a respectable writer. He was an Episcopalian and a bait fisherman."" Although Paul was three years younger than I was, he was already far ahead of me in anything relating to fishing and it was he who first found a copy of The Compleat Angler and reported back to me, "The bastard doesn't even know how to spell 'complete.' Besides, he has songs to sing to dairymaids." I borrowed his copy, and reported back to him, "Some of those songs are pretty good." He said, "Whoever saw a dairymaid on the Big Blackfoot River? (Source: press.uchicago.edu)

 

 

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