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Yellow violet

Yellow violet

Yellow violet

The Yellow Violet offers the same lovely essence of humility as it works gently through the solar plexus, or the third chakra, to help boost self-image, courage, and self-confidence for those who are shy and introverted. This special flower essence is wonderful for teens in the pubescence stage of life. The essence strengthens and encourages the blossoming of a new identity while opening the heart, enabling the individual to participate on a social level.

Violet

Of these latter, perennial type violas, there are more than 300 species native to North America. And of that number, about thirty are native to the Pacific Northwest! So widespread and similar in appearance, they can sometimes be difficult to identify in the wild. Everywhere from bogs and wetlands at low elevations, to moist-to-dry woodlands and low to mid-elevations, to dry meadows and rocky outcroppings at higher elevations – there are native violets to be found at every location and in every situation.This is one of the most commonly widespread violets in Western Oregon. Sweet yellow flowers rising slightly above bright green heart-shaped leaves, brightening up woodland settings; spreading by underground rhizomes, V. glabella will eventually carpet the ground with its cheery presence. Given enough moisture, it can become somewhat invasive; drier conditions can keep it more in check. But why not let it have its way throughout a woodland setting? Slugs and snails find the leaves of this violet to their liking, but other than that all-too-common pest, these violets are pretty immune to trouble in the garden.

Low-growing, with more triangular leaves and bright blue to blue-violet flowers, V. adunca prefers shade to dappled sun and moist soil, but is adaptable to a much wider variety of settings, thriving in even full sun if given sufficient moisture. Its unique characteristic is that the foliage is a major food source for the endangered Oregon Silver Spotted Butterfly, so if you find this violet's foliage is being eaten, look for a caterpillar first – you may be providing important habitat for an endangered Oregon native! Another woodland violet for moist conditions, V. sempervirens can be found in mossy, mostly-shady areas from low to mid-elevations, so it is happiest in similarly moist, shady to partly sunny spots in the garden. It is more compact and diminutive than V. glabella, but with similar yellow flowers. It is a suitable choice for planting between stepping stones. (Source: portlandnursery.com)

 

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