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wild dill

wild dill

wild dill

NEW! Perideridia americana, Wild Dill is an herbaceous perennial in the Carrot family. Because it has a tuberous root system, the plant develops rapidly in the spring and after a short bloom period that lasts about two weeks, the plant goes dormant for the rest of the year. Because of the short bloom period, this plant is often overlooked but it is rather lovely if you catch it at the right time.

Dill

You can typically find Wild Dill in soils that are rich and loamy but there is some tolerance for clay and rock. It should not be confused with Anethum graveolens, which is the cultivated Dill most commonly used as an herb or spice for flavoring for food. The foliage is not known to be toxic but there is little known on the edibility of Wild Dill. Another name is Thicket Parsley or Eastern Yampah.The native Wild Dill occurs occasionally in NE and central Illinois, but it is rare or absent elsewhere (see Distribution Map). Habitats include mesic black soil prairies, openings or edges near woodlands, areas along woodland paths, thickets, limestone glades, and bluffs. It often grows in grassy areas, but is easy to overlook, except during the short blooming period. This plant is more typical of high quality habitats than disturbed areas.

This is an ethereal plant that is lovely while in bloom; unfortunately, this doesn't last very long. From a distance, Wild Dill may appear to be an early blooming Daucus carota (Wild Carrot), but closer inspection of the foliage and flowers will reveal significant differences between these two plants. What sets Wild Dill apart from many other white-flowered members of the Carrot family is the season of bloom (early summer) and the slender, delicate leaves (not wider than 1/8" across). Also, it should not be confused with Anethum graveolens (Cultivated Dill); this familiar annual herb from the Old World has yellow flowers. Another common name for Perideridia americana is 'Thicket Parsley.'In central and eastern Europe, Scandinavia, the Baltic states, Ukraine, and Russia, dill is a staple culinary herb along with chives and parsley. Fresh, finely cut dill leaves are used as a topping in soups, especially the hot red borsht and the cold borsht mixed with curds, kefir, yogurt, or sour cream, which is served during hot summer weather and is called okroshka. It also is popular in summer to drink fermented milk (curds, kefir, yogurt, or buttermilk) mixed with dill (and sometimes other herbs). (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

 

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