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white christmas cast

white christmas cast

white Christmas cast

It is incredible that Strand Releasing would do anything but release the most amazing season of the show’s newest season on Christmas day. It seems they really were in time for Christmas.

DAVIS

On Christmas Eve in Europe in 1944, at the height of World War II, former Broadway star Captain Bob Wallace and aspiring performer Private Phil Davis entertain the 151st division with a soldier's show. The men have just received word their beloved Major General Thomas G. Waverly has been relieved of his command. Waverly arrives and delivers an emotional farewell. The men send him off with a rousing chorus of "The Old Man." After Waverly departs, enemy bombers attack the area and everyone takes cover. Davis shields Wallace from a collapsing wall and is wounded by debris. Wallace asks how he can pay back Davis for saving his life, and Davis suggests they become a duo act. Bob doesn't like this but feels obliged to agree. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

10 Fred Astaire was supposed to play Phil Davis. (Source: www.goodhousekeeping.com Bing Crosby, left, and Danny Kaye perform as singers Bob Wallace and Phil Davis in a scene from the film "White Christmas." The two characters are Army pals turned singer/producers after World War II. (Source:www.cnn.com))

Musical starring Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye. Old army buddies Phil Davis and Bob Wallace travel with the glamorous Haynes sisters to the Columbia Inn in Vermont. There, Phil and Bob are reunited with their old commanding officer, General Waverly, who is now struggling to keep the hotel going. The visitors decide there's only one answer - to put on a show. (Source: www.radiotimes.com)

On Christmas Eve, 1944, somewhere in war-torn Europe, soldiers of the U.S. Army's 151st Division enjoy a show put on by song-and-dance men Capt. Bob Wallace and Pvt. Phil Davis, in honor of their beloved departing general, Tom Waverly. When the camp suddenly is bombed, Phil saves Bob's life by pulling him out of the path of a collapsing brick wall. Later, Bob visits the injured Phil in the infirmary and declares that he "owes" Phil. Phil immediately pulls out a song he has written and suggests that Bob, a well-known soloist, repay him by performing it with him. Bob agrees, and the two become a popular duo following the war. One December night, in Florida, where they are performing their revue, Playing Around , Phil tries to fix bachelor Bob up with a chorus girl, but Bob angrily resists. The carefree Phil complains that because Bob has no love life, he spends all of his time working, and consequently, makes Phil work too hard as well. After Bob admits that he wants to find a "good" woman, the two head for a nightclub, where Betty and Judy Haynes, the sisters of a former Army buddy, are performing. Bob is instantly taken with Betty, while Phil is attracted to Judy. When Betty admits to Bob that the letter from their brother inviting them to their show was actually written by Judy, Bob laughingly accuses Judy of "having an angle." Betty, the older and more serious sister, takes umbrage at Bob's comment, and she and Bob quietly argue. Judy and Phil, however, hit it off and are delighted by Bob and Betty's apparent pairing. Just then, Novello, the club's owner, informs Judy that the sheriff is in his office, waiting to arrest her and Betty for non-payment of a $200 fee their landlord is demanding. After Judy, who along with Betty has an upcoming holiday job in Vermont, confesses to Phil that they are broke, Phil gives them the train tickets he and Bob were to use that night. While Novello stalls the sheriff, Betty and Judy sneak out of the club and flee in a cab. To assure the women reach the station, Phil and Bob go on stage in their place, sporting fans and garters and mouthing the words to a recording of one of the sisters' numbers. Afterward, Bob and Phil dash to catch the New York-bound train, and Bob is annoyed when Phil claims to have lost their drawing room tickets. Bob eventually deduces what happened to the tickets, but before he can confront the sisters, they burst into the club car to thank him for his generosity. Thus cornered, Bob says nothing about the tickets, and before long, Phil and Judy convince Bob to spend a few days in "snowy" Vermont. When they arrive there, however, they are shocked to find green grass and warm temperatures. At Columbia Inn, where they are to perform, Betty and Judy learn that because of the unseasonable weather, the inn has few guests and cannot afford their services. Just as Betty, Judy, Bob and Phil are about to leave, Gen. Waverly walks in with his granddaughter Susan. The general reveals that, after retiring from the Army, he sank all of his savings into the now failing inn. The general insists on honoring the sisters' contract, and that night, while the girls are singing, Bob and Phil concoct a plan to save the inn. Bob arranges for the entire cast and crew of Playing Around to come up from New York, explaining to the general that the inn is the perfect place to fine-tune the show before its Broadway opening. Later, after Phil and Judy connive to get Bob and Betty alone together, Betty admits to Bob she misjudged him and praises his selflessness. Although rehearsals at the inn go well, the general is crushed when he receives a letter from an Army friend, informing him that his request for reinstatement has been denied. Hoping to improve the general's spirits, Bob decides to go on the Ed Harrison television show and invite the veterans of the 151st Division to a Christmas Eve show at the inn. While he is talking on the phone with Ed, Emma Allen, the inn's nosy housekeeper, eavesdrops, but only hears Ed trying to convince Bob to exploit the event for publicity. Emma then tells Betty what she heard, and Betty, believing that Bob intends to take advantage of the general's plight, grows suddenly cold toward him. Judy concludes that Betty is having second thoughts about Bob because she is worried about abandoning her little sister, and convinces the marriage-shy Phil to become engaged to her until Bob and Betty are safely reunited. At a cast party, Judy and Phil announce their engagement, and are confused when Betty continues to snub Bob. Later that night, Judy assures Betty that the break-up of their act was inevitable, and the next day, Betty leaves for a solo job in New York and writes Judy a goodbye letter. After reading the letter, Judy and Phil confess to Bob about their phony engagement, and Bob, upset, decides to drop by Betty's club before his appearance on the Ed Harrison show. Despite his kind words, Betty treats Bob hostily. Bob then makes his live televised plea, and while Phil, Emma, Judy and Susan go to great lengths to prevent the general from watching the show, Betty tunes in and realizes her mistake. On Christmas Eve, hundreds of veterans and their families swarm to the inn to surprise the general, and Betty returns in time to appear in the revue. The general is deeply moved by the presence of so many of his men, and Betty is relieved to be reunited with Bob. Then, as snow begins to fall, Betty and Bob, and Phil and Judy kiss, happy in the knowledge that they will soon be married. (Source: www.tcm.com)

For a film that's remembered mostly as a warm, nostalgic holiday movie rather than as one of the all-time great musicals, White Christmas (1954) certainly commands a lot of star power and pop-cultural significance. Consider: it was the highest-grossing film of 1954 ($12 million); it was the biggest hit of director Michael Curtiz's career; co-stars Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye were ranked at the time as the #1 and #3 box office stars in the country; and "White Christmas" was already the most successful song in American history - a record it maintained for many decades more. Who doesn't know and love that song? Irving Berlin wrote it in 1940. Bing Crosby first performed it on December 25, 1941, on his CBS radio show. In May 1942 he recorded it, and in August of that year, he could be seen singing it on screen in the hit movie Holiday Inn. Soon it was at the top of the charts, where it remained for eleven weeks, and in early 1943 it won the Oscar® for Best Song. It hit #1 again in 1945 and 1947 and went on to hold the record as all-time bestselling single for over 50 years. (The song that finally knocked it down to #2? Elton John's 1997 recording of "Candle in the Wind," with lyrics rewritten to honor the late Princess Diana.) With the continuing popularity of the song (and Bing Crosby) through the 1940s, it was a no-brainer for Hollywood to want to capitalize on it yet again. As early as 1949, the movie White Christmas was in preparation at Paramount. The idea was to show off old and new Irving Berlin tunes and reunite the stars of Holiday Inn, Crosby and Fred Astaire. Irving Berlin recycled parts of the earlier film and mixed it with elements of an unproduced musical he had written with Norman Krasna called Stars on My Shoulders; Krasna went on, with Melvin Frank, to turn the new story into a screenplay. Fred Astaire, however, wasn't crazy about the script and pulled out. Paramount replaced him with Donald O'Connor, but he, too, had to pull out when he fell ill close to the start of production. According to author David Leopold (Irving Berlin's Show Business), Kaye asked for a huge paycheck - $200,000 plus ten percent of the gross - never expecting that it would be accepted. But Paramount realized that waiting for O'Connor would cost them about that much, and they bit the bullet. As production began, Berlin wrote in a letter to his friend Irving Hoffman, "It is the first movie that I've been connected with since Holiday Inn that has the feel of a Broadway musical. Usually there's little enthusiasm once you get over the first week of a picture. But the change in this setup has resulted in an excitement that I am sure will be reflected in the finished job. In any event, as of today I feel great and very much like an opening in Philadelphia with a show." The thin but serviceable plot finds Crosby and Kaye as a top song-and-dance act who take a vacation in Vermont with a pair of sister entertainers, Vera-Ellen and Rosemary Clooney. They arrive at a country inn run by the boys' former WWII commanding officer, Dean Jagger. He's about to go out of business due to a lack of snow so the foursome decides to put on a show to save the inn. Guess what happens? It's all an excuse for some fine Irving Berlin songs including "The Best Things Happen While You're Dancing," "Sisters," "Snow," "Love, You Didn't Do Right By Me," the Oscar®-nominated "Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep" and of course "White Christmas." Paramount chose White Christmas to be its first movie produced in VistaVision, the studio's widescreen answer to CinemaScope. The New York Time noted the technical achievement in its review: "The colors on the big screen are rich and luminous, the images are clear and sharp, and rapid movements are got without blurring - or very little." White Christmas was Michael Curtiz's first directing gig at Paramount after he left Warner Brothers. His Paramount contract allowed him the freedom to direct movies for other studios as well, and he thus floated around town from then on. Producer: Robert Emmett Dolan Director: Michael Curtiz Screenplay: Norman Krasna, Norman Panama, Melvin Frank Cinematography: Loyal Griggs Film Editing: Frank Bracht Art Direction: Roland Anderson, Hal Pereira Music: Gus Levene, Joseph J. Lilley, Bernard Mayers, Van Cleave Cast: Bing Crosby (Bob Wallace) Danny Kaye (Phil Davis), Rosemary Clooney (Betty Haynes), Vera-Ellen (Judy Haynes), Dean Jagger (Major General Waverly), Mary Wickes (Emma Allen). C-120m. by Jeremy Arnold (Source: www.tcm.com)

Jamie Wilson, Mark Goucher, Gavin Kalin and Kevin McCollum are thrilled to announce Broadway and West End star Sally Ann Triplett will join the Made at Curve’s production of Irving Berlin’s WHITE CHRISTMAS as ‘Martha Watson’ as it embarks on a UK tour. The show also stars Dan Burton as ‘Phil Davis’, Matthew Jeans as ‘Bob Wallace’, Jessica Daley as ‘Betty Haynes’, Emily Langham as ‘Judy Haynes’ and Duncan Smith as ‘General Waverly’. WHITE CHRISTMAS opens on Thursday 28 October at the New Victoria Theatre, Woking, before visiting The Bristol Hippodrome, Canterbury Marlowe, Manchester Palace Theatre, Plymouth Theatre Royal and Edinburgh Playhouse. The previously announced Sheila Ferguson has withdrawn from the production. (Source: www.londontheatre1.com)

Dan Burton reprises his role as ‘Phil Davis’, a part he played in this production of White Christmas at both the Dominion Theatre in London’s West End and at Curve, Leicester. He was nominated for an Olivier Award for his performance as Tulsa in Gypsy at the Savoy Theatre and his other West End credits include Jersey Boys, The Pajama Game, Chicago, Legally Blonde, Betty Blue Eyes and Guys and Dolls at the Royal Albert Hall. (Source: www.londontheatre1.com)

CAST

The girls convince Phil and Bob to forego New York and spend Christmas with them in Pine Tree, Vermont, where they are booked as performers. Upon arriving in Vermont, they find all the tourists have left due to no snow and unseasonably warm weather. They arrive at the empty Columbia Inn, and are aghast to discover that General Waverly is the landlord of the hotel, has sunk his life savings into it, and is in danger of bankruptcy. Phil and Bob decide to invite some of the cast of Playing Around to Pine Tree to stage a show to draw in the guests, and include Betty and Judy in the show. Betty and Bob's romance starts to bloom. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

This 1954 musical film centers around a group of entertainers during World War II keen on spreading the holiday spirit to save a failing Vermont inn. The star-studded cast is packed with several favorites from the era, like Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye, Rosemary Clooney, Vera-Ellen, and Dean Jagger. What's more, the film introduced to the world a number of catchy sing-along tunes, including "The Best Things Happen While You're Dancing" and "What Can You Do With a General?" Not to mention, the movie is also known for helping make the song "White Christmas" as iconic as it is today. (Source: www.goodhousekeeping.com)

The soundtrack rights for the film were controlled by Decca, but Rosemary Clooney was under exclusive contract to Columbia, a competing record label. So in 1954, Decca recorded and released an album with the movie cast minus Rosemary (her part was sung by Peggy Lee). And Columbia released an album with Rosemary singing eight songs from the film, which means the only way to hear her sing with Bing is on-screen! (Source: www.goodhousekeeping.com)

The song "Gee, I Wish I Was Back in the Army" has a lyric about seeing "Jolson, Hope, and Benny all for free" — a reference to wartime entertainers Al Jolson, Bob Hope, and Jack Benny. The original words were "Crosby, Hope, and Jolson all for free," but when Bing Crosby was cast, leaving it as-is would break the fourth wall. (Source: www.goodhousekeeping.com)

On Christmas Eve, 1944, somewhere in war-torn Europe, soldiers of the U.S. Army's 151st Division enjoy a show put on by song-and-dance men Capt. Bob Wallace and Pvt. Phil Davis, in honor of their beloved departing general, Tom Waverly. When the camp suddenly is bombed, Phil saves Bob's life by pulling him out of the path of a collapsing brick wall. Later, Bob visits the injured Phil in the infirmary and declares that he "owes" Phil. Phil immediately pulls out a song he has written and suggests that Bob, a well-known soloist, repay him by performing it with him. Bob agrees, and the two become a popular duo following the war. One December night, in Florida, where they are performing their revue, Playing Around , Phil tries to fix bachelor Bob up with a chorus girl, but Bob angrily resists. The carefree Phil complains that because Bob has no love life, he spends all of his time working, and consequently, makes Phil work too hard as well. After Bob admits that he wants to find a "good" woman, the two head for a nightclub, where Betty and Judy Haynes, the sisters of a former Army buddy, are performing. Bob is instantly taken with Betty, while Phil is attracted to Judy. When Betty admits to Bob that the letter from their brother inviting them to their show was actually written by Judy, Bob laughingly accuses Judy of "having an angle." Betty, the older and more serious sister, takes umbrage at Bob's comment, and she and Bob quietly argue. Judy and Phil, however, hit it off and are delighted by Bob and Betty's apparent pairing. Just then, Novello, the club's owner, informs Judy that the sheriff is in his office, waiting to arrest her and Betty for non-payment of a $200 fee their landlord is demanding. After Judy, who along with Betty has an upcoming holiday job in Vermont, confesses to Phil that they are broke, Phil gives them the train tickets he and Bob were to use that night. While Novello stalls the sheriff, Betty and Judy sneak out of the club and flee in a cab. To assure the women reach the station, Phil and Bob go on stage in their place, sporting fans and garters and mouthing the words to a recording of one of the sisters' numbers. Afterward, Bob and Phil dash to catch the New York-bound train, and Bob is annoyed when Phil claims to have lost their drawing room tickets. Bob eventually deduces what happened to the tickets, but before he can confront the sisters, they burst into the club car to thank him for his generosity. Thus cornered, Bob says nothing about the tickets, and before long, Phil and Judy convince Bob to spend a few days in "snowy" Vermont. When they arrive there, however, they are shocked to find green grass and warm temperatures. At Columbia Inn, where they are to perform, Betty and Judy learn that because of the unseasonable weather, the inn has few guests and cannot afford their services. Just as Betty, Judy, Bob and Phil are about to leave, Gen. Waverly walks in with his granddaughter Susan. The general reveals that, after retiring from the Army, he sank all of his savings into the now failing inn. The general insists on honoring the sisters' contract, and that night, while the girls are singing, Bob and Phil concoct a plan to save the inn. Bob arranges for the entire cast and crew of Playing Around to come up from New York, explaining to the general that the inn is the perfect place to fine-tune the show before its Broadway opening. Later, after Phil and Judy connive to get Bob and Betty alone together, Betty admits to Bob she misjudged him and praises his selflessness. Although rehearsals at the inn go well, the general is crushed when he receives a letter from an Army friend, informing him that his request for reinstatement has been denied. Hoping to improve the general's spirits, Bob decides to go on the Ed Harrison television show and invite the veterans of the 151st Division to a Christmas Eve show at the inn. While he is talking on the phone with Ed, Emma Allen, the inn's nosy housekeeper, eavesdrops, but only hears Ed trying to convince Bob to exploit the event for publicity. Emma then tells Betty what she heard, and Betty, believing that Bob intends to take advantage of the general's plight, grows suddenly cold toward him. Judy concludes that Betty is having second thoughts about Bob because she is worried about abandoning her little sister, and convinces the marriage-shy Phil to become engaged to her until Bob and Betty are safely reunited. At a cast party, Judy and Phil announce their engagement, and are confused when Betty continues to snub Bob. Later that night, Judy assures Betty that the break-up of their act was inevitable, and the next day, Betty leaves for a solo job in New York and writes Judy a goodbye letter. After reading the letter, Judy and Phil confess to Bob about their phony engagement, and Bob, upset, decides to drop by Betty's club before his appearance on the Ed Harrison show. Despite his kind words, Betty treats Bob hostily. Bob then makes his live televised plea, and while Phil, Emma, Judy and Susan go to great lengths to prevent the general from watching the show, Betty tunes in and realizes her mistake. On Christmas Eve, hundreds of veterans and their families swarm to the inn to surprise the general, and Betty returns in time to appear in the revue. The general is deeply moved by the presence of so many of his men, and Betty is relieved to be reunited with Bob. Then, as snow begins to fall, Betty and Bob, and Phil and Judy kiss, happy in the knowledge that they will soon be married. (Source: www.tcm.com)

For a film that's remembered mostly as a warm, nostalgic holiday movie rather than as one of the all-time great musicals, White Christmas (1954) certainly commands a lot of star power and pop-cultural significance. Consider: it was the highest-grossing film of 1954 ($12 million); it was the biggest hit of director Michael Curtiz's career; co-stars Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye were ranked at the time as the #1 and #3 box office stars in the country; and "White Christmas" was already the most successful song in American history - a record it maintained for many decades more. Who doesn't know and love that song? Irving Berlin wrote it in 1940. Bing Crosby first performed it on December 25, 1941, on his CBS radio show. In May 1942 he recorded it, and in August of that year, he could be seen singing it on screen in the hit movie Holiday Inn. Soon it was at the top of the charts, where it remained for eleven weeks, and in early 1943 it won the Oscar® for Best Song. It hit #1 again in 1945 and 1947 and went on to hold the record as all-time bestselling single for over 50 years. (The song that finally knocked it down to #2? Elton John's 1997 recording of "Candle in the Wind," with lyrics rewritten to honor the late Princess Diana.) With the continuing popularity of the song (and Bing Crosby) through the 1940s, it was a no-brainer for Hollywood to want to capitalize on it yet again. As early as 1949, the movie White Christmas was in preparation at Paramount. The idea was to show off old and new Irving Berlin tunes and reunite the stars of Holiday Inn, Crosby and Fred Astaire. Irving Berlin recycled parts of the earlier film and mixed it with elements of an unproduced musical he had written with Norman Krasna called Stars on My Shoulders; Krasna went on, with Melvin Frank, to turn the new story into a screenplay. Fred Astaire, however, wasn't crazy about the script and pulled out. Paramount replaced him with Donald O'Connor, but he, too, had to pull out when he fell ill close to the start of production. According to author David Leopold (Irving Berlin's Show Business), Kaye asked for a huge paycheck - $200,000 plus ten percent of the gross - never expecting that it would be accepted. But Paramount realized that waiting for O'Connor would cost them about that much, and they bit the bullet. As production began, Berlin wrote in a letter to his friend Irving Hoffman, "It is the first movie that I've been connected with since Holiday Inn that has the feel of a Broadway musical. Usually there's little enthusiasm once you get over the first week of a picture. But the change in this setup has resulted in an excitement that I am sure will be reflected in the finished job. In any event, as of today I feel great and very much like an opening in Philadelphia with a show." The thin but serviceable plot finds Crosby and Kaye as a top song-and-dance act who take a vacation in Vermont with a pair of sister entertainers, Vera-Ellen and Rosemary Clooney. They arrive at a country inn run by the boys' former WWII commanding officer, Dean Jagger. He's about to go out of business due to a lack of snow so the foursome decides to put on a show to save the inn. Guess what happens? It's all an excuse for some fine Irving Berlin songs including "The Best Things Happen While You're Dancing," "Sisters," "Snow," "Love, You Didn't Do Right By Me," the Oscar®-nominated "Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep" and of course "White Christmas." Paramount chose White Christmas to be its first movie produced in VistaVision, the studio's widescreen answer to CinemaScope. The New York Time noted the technical achievement in its review: "The colors on the big screen are rich and luminous, the images are clear and sharp, and rapid movements are got without blurring - or very little." White Christmas was Michael Curtiz's first directing gig at Paramount after he left Warner Brothers. His Paramount contract allowed him the freedom to direct movies for other studios as well, and he thus floated around town from then on. Producer: Robert Emmett Dolan Director: Michael Curtiz Screenplay: Norman Krasna, Norman Panama, Melvin Frank Cinematography: Loyal Griggs Film Editing: Frank Bracht Art Direction: Roland Anderson, Hal Pereira Music: Gus Levene, Joseph J. Lilley, Bernard Mayers, Van Cleave Cast: Bing Crosby (Bob Wallace) Danny Kaye (Phil Davis), Rosemary Clooney (Betty Haynes), Vera-Ellen (Judy Haynes), Dean Jagger (Major General Waverly), Mary Wickes (Emma Allen). C-120m. by Jeremy Arnold (Source: www.tcm.com)

The cast is completed by Phillip Bertioli, Imogen Bowtell, Isabel Canning, Freddie Clements, Meg Darcy, Adam Denman, Beth Devine, Kirsty Fuller, Ashton Harkness, Sam Holden, Matt Holland, Samuel John-Humphreys, Aoife Kenny, Ella Kemp, Joshua Lovell, Martin McCarthy, Ben Munday, Oliver Ramsdale, Kayleigh Thadani and Kraig Thornber. (Source: www.londontheatre1.com)

The cast is completed by Phillip Bertioli, Imogen Bowtell, Isabel Canning, Freddie Clements, Meg Darcy, Adam Denman, Beth Devine, Kirsty Fuller, Ashton Harkness, Sam Holden, Matt Holland, Samuel John-Humphreys, Aoife Kenny, Ella Kemp, Joshua Lovell, Martin McCarthy, Ben Munday, Oliver Ramsdale, Kayleigh Thadani and Kraig Thornber. (Source: www.londontheatre1.com)

CREW

On Christmas Eve, 1944, somewhere in war-torn Europe, soldiers of the U.S. Army's 151st Division enjoy a show put on by song-and-dance men Capt. Bob Wallace and Pvt. Phil Davis, in honor of their beloved departing general, Tom Waverly. When the camp suddenly is bombed, Phil saves Bob's life by pulling him out of the path of a collapsing brick wall. Later, Bob visits the injured Phil in the infirmary and declares that he "owes" Phil. Phil immediately pulls out a song he has written and suggests that Bob, a well-known soloist, repay him by performing it with him. Bob agrees, and the two become a popular duo following the war. One December night, in Florida, where they are performing their revue, Playing Around , Phil tries to fix bachelor Bob up with a chorus girl, but Bob angrily resists. The carefree Phil complains that because Bob has no love life, he spends all of his time working, and consequently, makes Phil work too hard as well. After Bob admits that he wants to find a "good" woman, the two head for a nightclub, where Betty and Judy Haynes, the sisters of a former Army buddy, are performing. Bob is instantly taken with Betty, while Phil is attracted to Judy. When Betty admits to Bob that the letter from their brother inviting them to their show was actually written by Judy, Bob laughingly accuses Judy of "having an angle." Betty, the older and more serious sister, takes umbrage at Bob's comment, and she and Bob quietly argue. Judy and Phil, however, hit it off and are delighted by Bob and Betty's apparent pairing. Just then, Novello, the club's owner, informs Judy that the sheriff is in his office, waiting to arrest her and Betty for non-payment of a $200 fee their landlord is demanding. After Judy, who along with Betty has an upcoming holiday job in Vermont, confesses to Phil that they are broke, Phil gives them the train tickets he and Bob were to use that night. While Novello stalls the sheriff, Betty and Judy sneak out of the club and flee in a cab. To assure the women reach the station, Phil and Bob go on stage in their place, sporting fans and garters and mouthing the words to a recording of one of the sisters' numbers. Afterward, Bob and Phil dash to catch the New York-bound train, and Bob is annoyed when Phil claims to have lost their drawing room tickets. Bob eventually deduces what happened to the tickets, but before he can confront the sisters, they burst into the club car to thank him for his generosity. Thus cornered, Bob says nothing about the tickets, and before long, Phil and Judy convince Bob to spend a few days in "snowy" Vermont. When they arrive there, however, they are shocked to find green grass and warm temperatures. At Columbia Inn, where they are to perform, Betty and Judy learn that because of the unseasonable weather, the inn has few guests and cannot afford their services. Just as Betty, Judy, Bob and Phil are about to leave, Gen. Waverly walks in with his granddaughter Susan. The general reveals that, after retiring from the Army, he sank all of his savings into the now failing inn. The general insists on honoring the sisters' contract, and that night, while the girls are singing, Bob and Phil concoct a plan to save the inn. Bob arranges for the entire cast and crew of Playing Around to come up from New York, explaining to the general that the inn is the perfect place to fine-tune the show before its Broadway opening. Later, after Phil and Judy connive to get Bob and Betty alone together, Betty admits to Bob she misjudged him and praises his selflessness. Although rehearsals at the inn go well, the general is crushed when he receives a letter from an Army friend, informing him that his request for reinstatement has been denied. Hoping to improve the general's spirits, Bob decides to go on the Ed Harrison television show and invite the veterans of the 151st Division to a Christmas Eve show at the inn. While he is talking on the phone with Ed, Emma Allen, the inn's nosy housekeeper, eavesdrops, but only hears Ed trying to convince Bob to exploit the event for publicity. Emma then tells Betty what she heard, and Betty, believing that Bob intends to take advantage of the general's plight, grows suddenly cold toward him. Judy concludes that Betty is having second thoughts about Bob because she is worried about abandoning her little sister, and convinces the marriage-shy Phil to become engaged to her until Bob and Betty are safely reunited. At a cast party, Judy and Phil announce their engagement, and are confused when Betty continues to snub Bob. Later that night, Judy assures Betty that the break-up of their act was inevitable, and the next day, Betty leaves for a solo job in New York and writes Judy a goodbye letter. After reading the letter, Judy and Phil confess to Bob about their phony engagement, and Bob, upset, decides to drop by Betty's club before his appearance on the Ed Harrison show. Despite his kind words, Betty treats Bob hostily. Bob then makes his live televised plea, and while Phil, Emma, Judy and Susan go to great lengths to prevent the general from watching the show, Betty tunes in and realizes her mistake. On Christmas Eve, hundreds of veterans and their families swarm to the inn to surprise the general, and Betty returns in time to appear in the revue. The general is deeply moved by the presence of so many of his men, and Betty is relieved to be reunited with Bob. Then, as snow begins to fall, Betty and Bob, and Phil and Judy kiss, happy in the knowledge that they will soon be married. (Source: www.tcm.com)

PLAY

After the war, the two make it big, first as performers, then as producers, launching a hit musical, Playing Around. They receive a letter supposedly from their old Mess Sergeant, Ben "Freckle Face" Haynes, asking them to view his sisters' act. They watch Betty and Judy sing at a nightclub. Phil, who likes to play matchmaker, notices Bob is interested in Betty. After the performance, the four meet, and Phil and Judy immediately hit it off. Betty and Bob, however, argue about Bob's cynicism, and the fact it was really Judy who wrote the letter instead of Ben. (Source: en.wikipedia.org The girls convince Phil and Bob to forego New York and spend Christmas with them in Pine Tree, Vermont, where they are booked as performers. Upon arriving in Vermont, they find all the tourists have left due to no snow and unseasonably warm weather. They arrive at the empty Columbia Inn, and are aghast to discover that General Waverly is the landlord of the hotel, has sunk his life savings into it, and is in danger of bankruptcy. Phil and Bob decide to invite some of the cast of Playing Around to Pine Tree to stage a show to draw in the guests, and include Betty and Judy in the show. Betty and Bob's romance starts to bloom. (Source:en.wikipedia.org))

as one of the stone-faced black-clad dancers surrounding Rosemary Clooney in "Love, You Didn't Do Right by Me". John Brascia leads the dance troupe and appears opposite Vera-Ellen throughout much of the movie, particularly in the "Mandy" and "Choreography" numbers. The photo Vera-Ellen shows of her brother Benny (the one Phil refers to as "Freckle-faced Haynes, the dog-faced boy") is actually a photo of Carl Switzer, who played Alfalfa in the Our Gang film series, in an army field jacket and helmet liner. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

^ Jones, Kenneth."Merry and Bright? Producers Hope White Christmas Will Play Broadway This Year" Archived June 28, 2008, at the Wayback Machine, playbill.com, June 25, 2008 (Source: en.wikipedia.org ^ Jones, Kenneth."White Christmas Will Make Broadway Debut in November, Playing to Early 2009" Archived August 8, 2008, at the Wayback Machine playbill.com August 4, 2008 (Source:en.wikipedia.org))

"Play a Simple Melody" (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

As Betty Haynes, Rosemary Clooney plays Vera-Ellen's older sister in the movie, but she was actually seven years younger. When the film came out, Rosemary was 26, and Vera-Ellen, 33. Even more striking? Bing, who plays her love interest, was 51 when the movie debuted. That's a 25-year-age gap! (It's also funny to note that Dean Jagger, who played the retired, elderly general was actually born a few months after Crosby.) (Source: www.goodhousekeeping.com)

When Bob looks at a picture of Benny Haynes, "The Dog-Faced Boy," it's actually an image of a grown-up Carl Switzer. He's best remembered for playing Alfalfa in the original Our Gang, also known as the The Little Rascals. (Source: www.goodhousekeeping.com After the final shot wrapped, the actors were told that they needed to redo the finale, Rosemary Clooney recalled in the DVD extras. The King and Queen of Greece were visiting the set and the producer hoped to "give them something to remember." So the entire scene was "reshot" — but without film in the camera or Bing Crosby, who had already left to play golf. (Source:www.goodhousekeeping.com))

Actress and dancer Vera-Ellen, center, with Crosby and actress and singer Rosemary Clooney in a scene from "White Christmas." Vera-Ellen and Clooney play a sister act, Betty and Judy Haynes. (Source: www.cnn.com)

At first, actors Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye were just playing around on set when they dressed up in parts of their female counterparts' costumes and performed their musical number. But director Michael Curtiz found it so funny that he filmed it and worked it into the movie. (Source: www.cnn.com)

On Christmas Eve, 1944, somewhere in war-torn Europe, soldiers of the U.S. Army's 151st Division enjoy a show put on by song-and-dance men Capt. Bob Wallace and Pvt. Phil Davis, in honor of their beloved departing general, Tom Waverly. When the camp suddenly is bombed, Phil saves Bob's life by pulling him out of the path of a collapsing brick wall. Later, Bob visits the injured Phil in the infirmary and declares that he "owes" Phil. Phil immediately pulls out a song he has written and suggests that Bob, a well-known soloist, repay him by performing it with him. Bob agrees, and the two become a popular duo following the war. One December night, in Florida, where they are performing their revue, Playing Around , Phil tries to fix bachelor Bob up with a chorus girl, but Bob angrily resists. The carefree Phil complains that because Bob has no love life, he spends all of his time working, and consequently, makes Phil work too hard as well. After Bob admits that he wants to find a "good" woman, the two head for a nightclub, where Betty and Judy Haynes, the sisters of a former Army buddy, are performing. Bob is instantly taken with Betty, while Phil is attracted to Judy. When Betty admits to Bob that the letter from their brother inviting them to their show was actually written by Judy, Bob laughingly accuses Judy of "having an angle." Betty, the older and more serious sister, takes umbrage at Bob's comment, and she and Bob quietly argue. Judy and Phil, however, hit it off and are delighted by Bob and Betty's apparent pairing. Just then, Novello, the club's owner, informs Judy that the sheriff is in his office, waiting to arrest her and Betty for non-payment of a $200 fee their landlord is demanding. After Judy, who along with Betty has an upcoming holiday job in Vermont, confesses to Phil that they are broke, Phil gives them the train tickets he and Bob were to use that night. While Novello stalls the sheriff, Betty and Judy sneak out of the club and flee in a cab. To assure the women reach the station, Phil and Bob go on stage in their place, sporting fans and garters and mouthing the words to a recording of one of the sisters' numbers. Afterward, Bob and Phil dash to catch the New York-bound train, and Bob is annoyed when Phil claims to have lost their drawing room tickets. Bob eventually deduces what happened to the tickets, but before he can confront the sisters, they burst into the club car to thank him for his generosity. Thus cornered, Bob says nothing about the tickets, and before long, Phil and Judy convince Bob to spend a few days in "snowy" Vermont. When they arrive there, however, they are shocked to find green grass and warm temperatures. At Columbia Inn, where they are to perform, Betty and Judy learn that because of the unseasonable weather, the inn has few guests and cannot afford their services. Just as Betty, Judy, Bob and Phil are about to leave, Gen. Waverly walks in with his granddaughter Susan. The general reveals that, after retiring from the Army, he sank all of his savings into the now failing inn. The general insists on honoring the sisters' contract, and that night, while the girls are singing, Bob and Phil concoct a plan to save the inn. Bob arranges for the entire cast and crew of Playing Around to come up from New York, explaining to the general that the inn is the perfect place to fine-tune the show before its Broadway opening. Later, after Phil and Judy connive to get Bob and Betty alone together, Betty admits to Bob she misjudged him and praises his selflessness. Although rehearsals at the inn go well, the general is crushed when he receives a letter from an Army friend, informing him that his request for reinstatement has been denied. Hoping to improve the general's spirits, Bob decides to go on the Ed Harrison television show and invite the veterans of the 151st Division to a Christmas Eve show at the inn. While he is talking on the phone with Ed, Emma Allen, the inn's nosy housekeeper, eavesdrops, but only hears Ed trying to convince Bob to exploit the event for publicity. Emma then tells Betty what she heard, and Betty, believing that Bob intends to take advantage of the general's plight, grows suddenly cold toward him. Judy concludes that Betty is having second thoughts about Bob because she is worried about abandoning her little sister, and convinces the marriage-shy Phil to become engaged to her until Bob and Betty are safely reunited. At a cast party, Judy and Phil announce their engagement, and are confused when Betty continues to snub Bob. Later that night, Judy assures Betty that the break-up of their act was inevitable, and the next day, Betty leaves for a solo job in New York and writes Judy a goodbye letter. After reading the letter, Judy and Phil confess to Bob about their phony engagement, and Bob, upset, decides to drop by Betty's club before his appearance on the Ed Harrison show. Despite his kind words, Betty treats Bob hostile. Bob then makes his live televised plea, and while Phil, Emma, Judy and Susan go to great lengths to prevent the general from watching the show, Betty tunes in and realizes her mistake. On Christmas Eve, hundreds of veterans and their families swarm to the inn to surprise the general, and Betty returns in time to appear in the revue. The general is deeply moved by the presence of so many of his men, and Betty is relieved to be reunited with Bob. Then, as snow begins to fall, Betty and Bob, and Phil and Judy kiss, happy in the knowledge that they will soon be married. (Source: www.tcm.com)

 

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