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When Do Campanula Bloom

When Do Campanula Bloom

When Do Campanula Bloom

Campanulas’ long blooming period shows their best colors from late spring until the first frost occurs in early fall. Little maintenance is required to keep these flowers happy. Just water during dry periods and fertilize with an all-purpose (5-10-10 or 10-10-10) garden food once in the spring and once during the mid-summer.The perennial Bellflower gets its name from the flared bottoms of the flower blooms that give them the appearance of colorful bells. With varying plant heights that reach anywhere from 1- 6 feet (depending on the variety planted), these hardy plants make great additions to rock gardens and cottage gardens.

Bloom

The genus Campanula contains an astonishing 500 species, making it one of the most diverse genera in mass production. Although the common name, bellflower, suggests tubular flowers, the size and shape of the blooms—as well as those species whose flowers in no way resemble a bell—gives some idea of the diversity of the genus. Those with a passing familiarity of campanulas know that many species hail from Europe—which is true, but too simplistic. They are found in high alpine meadows as well as in lowlands, and many are found in Turkey, Croatia, and the Caucasus; there are even species from Greece and the Azores. And that’s not counting those endemic to Western Asia, Japan, Korea, and the Arctic. This is one well-travelled genus.Peach-leaved bellflower (Campanula persicifolia), a perennial from the Alps and other European mountains, sports two- to three-inch, open, bell-shaped, purple flowers that flare out in clusters from three-foot-tall vertical stems above a basal clump of slender, shiny, deep-green leaves. Plants can easily fill out a two-foot-wide area and bloom over a long period in summer. The variety ‘Telham Beauty’ offers otherworldly milky-blue flowers.

Clustered bellflower (Campanula glomerata) is another sun-lover that earns its common name with terminal, tightly clustered, deep-violet bells. This vigorous, two-foot-high perennial species’ blooms make an excellent cut flower, and removing spent flowering stems encourages reblooming. Scottish harebell (Campanula rotundifolia) is a lower growing perennial species with spindly stems and small, pale-violet, bell-shaped flowers that wave their nodding heads in the breeze. This species prefers to be on the dry side.Variable late spring through summer blooms in shades of blue, lavender, and violet predominate, but white and pink varieties are also available in this charming genus. Growing to heights ranging from 3″ to 30″, there is a Campanula for almost every garden situation, from the front of the rock garden to the back of the perennial border. (Source: www.whiteflowerfarm.com)

 

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