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What's a verb

What's a verb

What's a verb

A verb is an action word that tells what is happening to something. It is a word that tells about movement. If a verb is used to describe more than one action word, it can then be classified as a verb phrase.Irregular verbs are those that don’t take on the regular spelling patterns of past simple and past participle verbs. Unfortunately, there are hundreds of irregular verbs in the English language. But don’t worry, while many are used often, the majority are not in common usage – or if they are, you will use them so often you will learn them quickly. Some of the most common irregular verbs include: say, make, go, take, come, know and see.

WORDS KEY

: a word that characteristically is the grammatical center of a predicate and expresses an act, occurrence, or mode of being, that in various languages is inflected for agreement with the subject, for tense, for voice, for mood, or for aspect, and that typically has rather full descriptive meaning and characterizing quality but is sometimes nearly devoid of these especially when used as an auxiliary or linking verb Recent Examples on the Web: Noun That is until Zoom simplified the process to such a degree that its company name is now a verb for millions of users around the world. — John Dillon, Forbes, 15 Nov. 2021 For millions of people, Slack is a verb, a utility, and a way of life. — Declan Harty, Fortune, 13 Oct. 2021 Start each sentence with an action verb like directed, created, drove, headed, implemented, etc. — Robin Ryan, Forbes, 2 Nov. 2021 The word ‘wrong’ can be an adjective, a noun and a verb.

New York Times, 2 Nov. 2021 For millions of people, Slack is a verb, a utility, and a way of life. — Declan Harty, Fortune, 13 Oct. 2021 The word first appeared as a noun in the 1980s and then started to be used as a verb in the early 21st century, according to the report. — Jack Guy, CNN, 1 Nov. 2021 In Italian, as in French, there are also distinctions in the aspect of the verb that don’t exist in German. — Dylan Byron, The New Yorker, 24 Oct. 2021 For millions of people, Slack is a verb, a utility, and a way of life. — Declan Harty, Fortune, 13 Oct. 2021 to use (a word and especially a noun) as a verb : to make (a word) into a verb A television announcer in Vero Beach, Fla., spoke of a promise "to upkeep the beach," thus verbing a word that had been in use as an honest noun since 1884.— James Kilpatrick But it is by no means unusual for a noun to be verbed.— Theodore M. Bernstein (Source: www.merriam-webster.com)

WORD

a word that characteristically is the grammatical center of a predicate and expresses an act, occurrence, or mode of being, that in various languages is inflected for agreement with the subject, for tense, for voice, for mood, or for aspect, and that typically has rather full descriptive meaning and characterizing quality but is sometimes nearly devoid of these especially when used as an auxiliary or linking verb to use (a word and especially a noun) as a verb : to make (a word) into a verb A television announcer in Vero Beach, Fla., spoke of a promise "to upkeep the beach," thus verbing a word that had been in use as an honest noun since 1884.— James Kilpatrick But it is by no means unusual for a noun to be verbed.— Theodore M. Bernstein

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun That is until Zoom simplified the process to such a degree that its company name is now a verb for millions of users around the world. — John Dillon, Forbes, 15 Nov. 2021 For millions of people, Slack is a verb, a utility, and a way of life. — Declan Harty, Fortune, 13 Oct. 2021 Start each sentence with an action verb like directed, created, drove, headed, implemented, etc. — Robin Ryan, Forbes, 2 Nov. 2021 The word ‘wrong’ can be an adjective, a noun and a verb. — New York Times, 2 Nov. 2021 For millions of people, Slack is a verb, a utility, and a way of life. — Declan Harty, Fortune, 13 Oct. 2021 The word first appeared as a noun in the 1980s and then started to be used as a verb in the early 21st century, according to the report. — Jack Guy, CNN, 1 Nov. 2021 In Italian, as in French, there are also distinctions in the aspect of the verb that don’t exist in German. — Dylan Byron, The New Yorker, 24 Oct. 2021 For millions of people, Slack is a verb, a utility, and a way of life. — Declan Harty, Fortune, 13 Oct. 2021 When learning the rules of grammar, schoolchildren are often taught that verbs are ‘doing’ words, meaning they signify the part of the sentence which explains the action taking place: He ran away, she eats chocolate cake on Sundays, the horses gallop across the fields. Ran, eats and gallop are the ‘action’ parts of those sentences, thus they are the verbs. However, it can be confusing because not all verbs are easily identifiable as action: I know your name, Jack thought about it, we considered several applications. These are non-action verbs, i.e. those that describe a state of being, emotion, possession, sense or opinion. Other non-action verbs include include love, agree, feel, am, and have. (Source: www.gingersoftware.com)

 

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