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Uss atlanta

Uss atlanta

Uss atlanta

The U.S.S. Atlanta was one of the most celebrated of the World War II-era Toledo-class light cruisers, weighing in at 8,000 tons, 8 × 8. 5-inch guns, and more. Outwardly she was handsome, with her long, retractable boAw mounted superfiring turret.

Navy

USS Atlanta (CL-51) of the United States Navy was the lead ship of the Atlanta class of eight light cruisers. She was the third Navy ship named after the city of Atlanta, Georgia. Designed to provide anti-aircraft protection for US naval task groups, Atlanta served in this capacity in the naval battles Midway and the Eastern Solomons. Atlanta was heavily damaged by Japanese and friendly gunfire in a night surface action on 13 November 1942 during the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal. The cruiser was sunk on her captain's orders in the afternoon of the same day. 

The first of the new class of ships was laid down on 22 April 1940 at Kearny, New Jersey, by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., launched on 6 September 1941, sponsored by Margaret Mitchell (author of Gone with the Wind), and commissioned at the New York Navy Yard on 24 December 1941, Captain Samuel P. Jenkins in command. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

After fitting out, Atlanta conducted shakedown training until 13 March 1942, first in Chesapeake Bay and then in Maine's Casco Bay, after which she returned to the New York Navy Yard for post-shakedown repairs and alterations. Adjudged to be "ready for distant service" on 31 March, the new cruiser departed New York for the Panama Canal Zone on 5 April. She reached Cristobal on 8 April. After transiting the isthmian waterway, Atlanta then cleared Balboa on 12 April with orders to reconnoiter Clipperton Island, a tiny barren, uninhabited atoll about 670 mi (1,080 km) southwest of Acapulco, Mexico, in the course of her voyage to the Hawaiian Islands, for any signs of enemy activity. Finding none, she ultimately reached Pearl Harbor on 23 April. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

en.wikipedia.org)Atlanta reached Kukum about 14:00, at which point Captain Jenkins conferred with his remaining officers. As Jenkins, who was later awarded a Navy Cross for his heroism during the battle, later wrote, "It was by now apparent that efforts to save the ship were useless, and that the water was gaining steadily." Even had sufficient salvage facilities been available, he allowed, the severe damage she had taken would have made it difficult to save the ship. Authorized by Commander, South Pacific Forces, to act at his own discretion regarding the destruction of the ship, Jenkins ordered that Atlanta be abandoned and sunk with a demolition charge. (Source:

United States Navy Georgia-related ships (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

USS Atlanta (CL-104) of the United States Navy was a Cleveland-class light cruiser during World War II. She was the fourth Navy ship named after the city of Atlanta, Georgia. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

After commissioning the light cruiser got underway on 5 January 1945 for shakedown training in the Chesapeake Bay and the Caribbean. Upon the completion of those exercises, Atlanta arrived at Norfolk, Virginia, on 14 February and then moved up the coast to Philadelphia. After a period in the navy yard there, she sailed on 27 March for the Pacific. She stopped at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, and transited the Panama Canal before reaching Pearl Harbor on 18 April. From 19 April to 1 May, the ship conducted training exercises in Hawaiian waters. She then sailed to Ulithi and reported to Task Force 58 on 12 May. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

en.wikipedia.org)Atlanta's career had not yet ended, however. She underwent an extensive modification at the San Francisco Naval Shipyard. Reinstated on the Navy list as IX-304 on 15 May 1964, the vessel was converted to a target ship for studies of the effects of high energy air explosions on naval ships. The changes included cutting her hull down to the main deck level and erecting various experimental superstructures, designed for guided missile frigates and guided missile destroyers, on her deck. In these configurations she was subjected to explosions to determine whether or not the experimental structures could satisfactorily combine essential lightness with equally essential strength and blast resistance. These three tests were conducted off the coast of Kahoolawe, Hawaii, in early 1965, known as Operation Sailor Hat. Atlanta was damaged, but not sunk, by the experiments. She was laid up at Stockton, California, sometime late in 1965. Her name was again struck from the Register on 1 April 1970, and she was sunk during an explosive test off San Clemente Island on 1 October 1970. (Source:

The third Atlanta (CL-51)—, the first of a new class of ships originally conceived as destroyer flotilla leaders but which came to be employed as particularly effective antiaircraft cruisers, —was laid down on 22 April 1940 at Kearny, N.J., by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Co.; launched on 6 September 1941; sponsored by Mrs. John R. Marsh (better known by her pen name, Margaret Mitchell, the author of the novel Gone With the Wind; and commissioned at the New York Navy Yard on the day before Christmas [24 December] 1941, Capt. Samuel P. Jenkins in command. (Source: www.history.navy.mil)

After fitting out, Atlanta conducted shakedown training until 13 March 1942, first in Chesapeake Bay and then in Maine's Casco Bay, after which she returned to the New York Navy Yard for post-shakedown repairs and alterations. Adjudged "ready for distant service" on 31 March, the new light cruiser departed New York for the Panama Canal Zone on 5 April. She reached Cristobal on the 8th. After transiting the Isthmian Waterway, Atlanta then cleared Balboa on 12 April with orders to reconnoiter Clipperton Island—a tiny, barren, uninhabited atoll about 670 miles southwest of Acapulco, Mexico,— in the course of her voyage to the Hawaiian islands, for any signs of enemy activity. Finding none, she ultimately reached Pearl Harbor on 23 April. (Source: www.history.navy.mil)

www.history.navy.mil)Scene on Atlanta's (CL-51) fantail during her commissioning ceremonies at the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn, NY, 24 December 1941. Standing in the foreground are (left to right): Captain Samuel P. Jenkins, commanding officer; Rear Admiral Adolphus Andrews; Margaret Mitchell (Mrs. John R. Marsh), ship's sponsor; Captain Harold V. McKittrick; and Rear Admiral Edward J. Marquart. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command photograph. Catalog#: NH 57451. (Source:

Atlanta reached Kukum about 1400, midway through the afternoon watch, at which point Capt. Jenkins conferred with his remaining officers. As Jenkins, who later received a Navy Cross for his heroism during the battle, would write, "It was by now apparent that efforts to save the ship were useless, and that the water was gaining steadily." Even had sufficient salvage facilities been available, he allowed, the severe damage the ship had suffered in battle would have rendered it doubtful whether or not she could have been saved. Authorized by Commander, South Pacific Forces, to act at his own discretion regarding her destruction, Capt. Jenkins ordered that Atlanta be abandoned and sunk with a demolition charge. (Source: www.history.navy.mil)

www.history.navy.mil)Accordingly, all remaining men except the captain and the demolition party boarded Higgins boats sent out from Guadalcanal for the purpose. After the charge had been set and exploded, the last men left the battered ship. Ultimately, at 2015 on 13 November 1942, Atlanta sank three miles west of Lunga Point in 30 fathoms. Her name was stricken from the Navy list on 13 January 1943. (Source:

The U.S. Navy light cruiser USS Atlanta (CL-51) steaming at high speed, probably during her trials, circa in November 1941. (Source: wiki.warthunder.com)

USS Atlanta (CL-51) was the lead ship of her class of light cruisers built for the United States Navy during the Second World War. Designed as light anti-aircraft cruisers similar to the British Dido-class, the Atlanta was commissioned in December of 1941 just after the American entry into the Second World War. She went on to see combat action in the Pacific Theatre, and participated in the Midway and Eastern Solomons conflicts. She was later abandoned and sunk after being hit by Japanese torpedoes and friendly fire at the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal. (Source: wiki.warthunder.com)

Atlanta-class light cruisers came to being in the late 1930s, during which the US Navy was considering a multitude of different design proposals for new light cruisers, which would be in accordance with the limitations set by the Second London Naval Treaty of 1936. (Source: wiki.warthunder.com)

Navy History and Heritage Command. (2019, August 20). Atlanta III (CL-51). Retrieved January 26, 2021, from https://www.history.navy.mil/research/histories/ship-histories/danfs/a/atlanta-cl-51-iii.html (Source: wiki.warthunder.com)

The Bobolink arrived at 0930 on 13 November, took Atlanta under tow, made harder by the cruiser’s still lowered anchor, and headed toward Lunga Point. Atlanta reached Kukum about 1400, at which point Captain Jenkins conferred with his remaining officers. As Jenkins, who was later awarded a Navy Cross for his heroism during the battle, later wrote, “It was by now apparent that efforts to save the ship were useless, and that the water was gaining steadily.” Even had sufficient salvage facilities been available, he allowed, the severe damage she had taken would have made it difficult to save the ship. Authorized by Commander, South Pacific Forces, to act at his own discretion regarding the destruction of the ship, Jenkins ordered that Atlanta be abandoned and sunk with a demolition charge. (Source: scubaworld.com.au)

Top Row - Navy Combat Action Ribbon - Presidential Unit Citation (Source: www.navsource.org)

Brooklyn Navy Yard (24 Dec 1941) – Attending the commissioning of the cruiser this morning was Miss Margaret Mitchell who was sponsor of the ship (center) with Captain Samuel P. Jenkins (left) commanding officer of the cruiser Atlanta and Commander Campbell O. Emery (Right) is the Executive Officer aboard the cruiser Atlanta. The ship was commissioned today at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (Source: www.navsource.org)

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