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treat williams

treat williams

treat williams

April has been about loving life in much the sake I have. The latest chapter in our love story is just one of many, but the time to find each other was about 12 years ago. Here's how we met and how our experience with infertility taught us to appreciate life more.

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He first became well known for his starring role in the 1969 musical film Hair, and later also starred in the films Prince of the City, Once Upon a Time in America, The Late Shift and 127 Hours. From 2002 to 2006, he was the lead of the television series Everwood and was nominated for two Screen Actors Guild Awards. He has additionally been nominated for three Golden Globe Awards, two Satellite Awards and an Independent Spirit Award. (Source: en.wikipedia.org Williams' second Golden Globe nomination was for his starring role in Sidney Lumet's Prince of the City (1981). His third nomination was for his performance as Stanley Kowalski in the television presentation of A Streetcar Named Desire. In 1996, he was nominated for a Best Actor Emmy Award by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences for his work in The Late Shift, an HBO movie, in which he portrayed agent Michael Ovitz. (Source:en.wikipedia.org))

Prolific actor Treat Williams went from early success on Broadway to starring roles in highly anticipated film projects before ultimately earning a reputation as a versatile performer capable of playing the hero, villain, or later in his career, sturdy father figure. After establishing a commanding screen presence with diverse performances in Milos Forman's underrated musical "Hair" (1979) and Sidney Lumet's superior cop drama "Prince of the City" (1981), Williams seemed poised to enter the ranks of A-list actors. However, a series of poor career choices and bad luck at the box office relegated him to made-for-television projects and low-budget thrillers for a number of years. There were occasional bright spots, such as a supporting role in Sergio Leone's massive gangster drama "Once Upon a Time in America" (1984) and a noteworthy turn as a crazy criminal in the thriller "Things to Do in Denver When You're Dead" (1995). On television Williams earned an Emmy nomination for his portrayal of agent Michael Ovitz in "The Late Shift" (HBO, 1996), and won acclaim as the lead of the drama series "Everwood" (The WB, 2002-06). Although cast more frequently in the role of patriarch at this point in his career, Williams had long since proven his versatility as one of the most dependable actors in Hollywood. (Source: www.rottentomatoes.com)

Williams: It was amazing to be a part of that film, because growing up in the late 1960s, I would drive around in my mother’s convertible Mustang singing along to the album from the Broadway production of Hair on her eight-track player. I had to prove that I was ready for the role. I didn’t just have to prove it to the director, Miloš Forman. I also had to prove it to the musical director, and Galt McDermot (who wrote the music), as well as Gerome Ragni and Jim Rado. They all had different opinions of who they wanted and what they were looking for. Lastly, I had to prove it to the choreographer, Twyla Tharp, who was a real taskmaster. By the end of my audition for her, I was completely exhausted, but I knew I was proving to her that I would give her a work ethic that she could work with, because I was not a dancer by any means. The last audition for Hair was especially strange. It was my twelfth audition. I had to do the monologue from the theatre version, (Source: www.vtmag.com)

Williams: I was sitting at a party for the Dorset Theatre Festival, and I got a call from someone who told me that I had been offered the role of Mike Ovitz in The Late Shift. I asked them what I had to do, and they told me that shooting started in two days. Two days later, I was in front of a camera. That was another baptism by fire, but the director, Betty Thomas, was wonderful. She gave me my own office space where I could go work on the scene where I asked David Letterman to become my client in the film. I found out that Ovitz believed in the philosophy of The Art of War, which was one of his favorite books. I decided to be very Zen, polite, and quiet in the scene, and tell him what I was going to do for him. It worked out well. It was a lot of fun. The director really let me run with it. (Source: www.vtmag.com)

Williams’s many television projects include a Golden Globe® Award-nominated performance in “A Streetcar Named Desire,” an Emmy® Award-nominated performance in HBO’s “The Late Shift,” Hallmark Hall of Fame’s “Front of the Class" and the Hallmark Movies & Mysteries Original “Beyond the Blackboard” as well as Lifetime’s “The Staircase Murders.” He has also appeared in such series as The CW’s “Heartland,” ABC’s “Brothers & Sisters” and had a lead role in The WB’s “Everwood,” for which he earned two SAG Award nominations. (Source: www.hallmarkchannel.com)

Williams’s many television projects include a Golden Globe® Award-nominated performance in “A Streetcar Named Desire,” an Emmy® Award-nominated performance in HBO’s “The Late Shift,” Hallmark Hall of Fame’s “Front of the Class" and the Hallmark Movies & Mysteries Original “Beyond the Blackboard” as well as Lifetime’s “The Staircase Murders.” He has also appeared in such series as The CW’s “Heartland,” ABC’s “Brothers & Sisters” and had a lead role in The WB’s “Everwood,” for which he earned two SAG Award nominations. (Source: www.hallmarkchannel.com The latest on Blu-ray and streaming, including Freaky, Let Him Go, Greenland, and Criterion editions of The Parallax View, Smooth Talk, and two films by Ramin Bahrani. (Source:www.rogerebert.com))

As for TV, Williams is known for playing Dr. Andy Brown on the WB's Everwood, playing a New York City doctor who moves his family to a small town in Colorado. He's appeared on Brothers & Sisters in the recurring role of David Morton, Good Advice, White Collar, Chicago Fire on NBC, Hawaii Five-0 on CBS, and even Blue Bloods. His resume of TV films is incredibly impressive as well including the starring role of Stanley Kowalski in A Streetcar Named Desire, as well as lead roles in Dempsey, J. Edgar Hoover, The Late Shift (which earned Williams an Emmy nomination), and Dolly Parton's Netflix film Christmas on the Square. (Source: www.wideopencountry.com But after years of appearing in notable stage productions like The Pirates of Penzance, Williams did successfully create a strong career for himself in TV and film. He was in Sergio Leone's Once Upon a Time in America, Flashpoint, Deep Rising, Second Act, The Phantom, What Happens in Vegas, The Ritz, Prince of the City, Deadly Hero, Smooth Talk, Mulholland Falls, The Late Shift, Attack of the 50 Foot Cheerleader, and Why Would I Lie? He even had a cameo as a stormtrooper in The Empire Strikes Back! (Source:www.wideopencountry.com))

HAIR

Williams: I had already starred in several films by the end of my run with Grease. One of them was a film called Deadly Hero, which was the first film that James Earl Jones and I did together. I didn’t have any scenes with Jimmy, but we worked together later on Everwood. That was my first real film role. I played a young cop and I was just so excited to be in front of the camera. After that, I went to London to do a play that Rita Moreno, Jack Weston, and Jerry Stiller were starring in called The Ritz. We also did a film version with Richard Lester, who directed the Beatles movies and some other very, very good films. While I was there, I met the director John Sturges, and ended up playing a nice little part in The Eagle Has Landed with Michael Caine. I already knew how to act by then, but I started learning what it was like to be on a movie set. Michael Caine was really a wonderful role model. He didn’t mentor me directly, but he mentored me by just doing what he did and letting me watch and learn from him. After The Eagle Has Landed wrapped, I was told to go to Los Angeles, and I was out there for six months. I was miserable there. I went to my agent’s office and I said, “I can’t do this. I don’t want to drive around this big city waiting in rooms for an hour and a half – just to go in and try and prove that I’m good at something I already know I’m pretty good at.” I didn’t like auditioning, so I went home to take some time away from it. Just as I was getting home, the lead actor in Grease broke his leg, so I went back into Grease again. Not long after that, I found out that they were auditioning people for the film version of Hair. That was a very difficult and long four or five-month period of proving to them that I was the right guy for the role. (Source:www.vtmag.com)

Williams: I had already starred in several films by the end of my run with Grease. One of them was a film called Deadly Hero, which was the first film that James Earl Jones and I did together. I didn’t have any scenes with Jimmy, but we worked together later on Everwood. That was my first real film role. I played a young cop and I was just so excited to be in front of the camera. After that, I went to London to do a play that Rita Moreno, Jack Weston, and Jerry Stiller were starring in called The Ritz. We also did a film version with Richard Lester, who directed the Beatles movies and some other very, very good films. While I was there, I met the director John Sturges, and ended up playing a nice little part in The Eagle Has Landed with Michael Caine. I already knew how to act by then, but I started learning what it was like to be on a movie set. Michael Caine was really a wonderful role model. He didn’t mentor me directly, but he mentored me by just doing what he did and letting me watch and learn from him. After The Eagle Has Landed wrapped, I was told to go to Los Angeles, and I was out there for six months. I was miserable there. I went to my agent’s office and I said, “I can’t do this. I don’t want to drive around this big city waiting in rooms for an hour and a half – just to go in and try and prove that I’m good at something I already know I’m pretty good at.” I didn’t like auditioning, so I went home to take some time away from it. Just as I was getting home, the lead actor in Grease broke his leg, so I went back into Grease again. Not long after that, I found out that they were auditioning people for the film version of Hair. That was a very difficult and long four or five-month period of proving to them that I was the right guy for the role. (Source: www.vtmag.com)

Williams: I think if you forget you’ve done those other things, you can get frustrated in certain roles. I like to think I’ve already proven myself on the “crazy meter” and the “dramatic meter” with Prince of the City or with Hair. If you’ve done those roles where you’ve gone the distance, why not just relax and know that you have the chance to do a two-page scene every third day. I like to demonstrate a sense of fun and leadership on the set when I’m there. The crew always seems happy when I walk in and say good morning to everybody. We have a lot of fun making whatever we make. I love my job on Hallmark. There’s a reason people binge-watch Hallmark. They don’t have to feel bad. They can feel good for two hours, and they can forget their troubles. There is a place for that, I think, particularly right now in this world. (Source: www.vtmag.com Williams: I didn’t know him personally, but he called me up after he saw the movie. He said, “I don’t know if this is self-serving, but I wanted to tell you something. I thought you were very good in the film, but there are two things I do have a problem with: first, I never wear white suits. Second, you have nicer hair than I do.” I said, “Well, I apologize for both, but I can’t help the second thing you mentioned.” That was the last time we talked, but I saw him once again in a restaurant, and he sent me a Mickey Mouse watch because he was working for Disney at the time that the film was released. (Source:www.vtmag.com))

 

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