FutureStarr

tony leung chiu wai

tony leung chiu wai

tony leung chiu wai

When my daughter was born, I spent a lot of time with her, but I also loved to spend time writing, working out, and running. I was a devout stationary runner. I loved the way I felt when I completed a run. I loved getting those endorphins from my body. And I loved seeing her smile because she loved me running.

TIME

Tony Leung Chiu-wai (Chinese: 梁朝偉, born 27 June 1962) is a Hong Kong actor and singer. He is one of Asia's most successful and internationally recognised actors, and was named as "Small Tiger" among the Five Tiger Generals of TVB. He has won many international acting prizes, including the Cannes Film Festival award for Best Actor for his performance in Wong Kar-wai's film In the Mood for Love. He was named by CNN as one of "Asia's 25 Greatest Actors of All Time". (Source: en.wikipedia.org Leung starred in the highly successful Police Cadet TV serial in 1984 (later named Police Cadet 84 to distinguish it from its two subsequent sequels). He played an outgoing young man who decides to become a police officer; Maggie Cheung, who also started her career at the same time, played a shy bookworm, Leung's upstairs neighbour and love interest. (Source:en.wikipedia.org))

They dated for 19 years before marrying in Bhutan in 2008. They had known each other since The Replica in 1984, and worked on-screen together in Replica (1984), Duke of Mount Deer (1984), Police Cadet (1984, 1985, 1988), The Yangs' Saga (1985), Days of Being Wild (1991), He ain't heavy, he's my father (1993), Ashes of Time (1994), and 2046 (2005). (Source: en.wikipedia.org)Since then they have worked together on The Yang's Saga (1985) and in the films Days of Being Wild (1991), The Eagle Shooting Heroes (1993), Ashes of Time (1994), In the Mood for Love (2000), Hero (2002), and 2046 (2005). Interviewed by Wong Kar Wai, Leung said that he considered Maggie to be his alter ego. "Maggie is a truly formidable partner – one to waltz with. We do not spend a lot of time with each other, as we like to keep some mystery between us. Whenever I see her, I discover something new about her". (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Durbin, Karen (7 August 2005). "Still in the Mood for a Collaboration". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 17 September 2021. (Source: en.wikipedia.org Wise, Damon (18 October 2007). "Why Tony Leung is in the mood for lust". The Times. London. Retrieved 25 May 2010. (Source:en.wikipedia.org eTony Leung Ka-fai (simplified Chinese: 梁家辉; traditional Chinese: 梁家輝; born 1 February 1958) is a Hong Kong actor who is a four-time winner of the Hong Kong Film Award for Best Actor. (Source:n.wikipedia.org)))

The story of Tony Leung’s life is very much like a Tony Leung movie. When he was seven years old, his father, the manager of a nightclub, left his mother for the third and final time. This was in late-’60s Hong Kong, a world where broken families were rare, and the abandonment made Leung into a private, reclusive person. “I didn’t know how to deal with people after my father left me,” he says. “When you’re a kid, everybody’s talking about their father, their family, how happy they are, how great their father is. I think from that time I stopped communicating with people. And I became very suppressed.” (Source: www.gq.com Wong and Leung would go on to make a total of seven films together, including The Grandmaster, in which Leung stars as Bruce Lee’s legendary martial arts trainer, Ip Man, and 2046, a surreal picture with no script and a production that lasted for four years. But it was Wong’s 2000 film, In the Mood for Love, that introduced Leung to a worldwide audience, and won him a best actor award at Cannes. Leung plays a writer whose wife travels a great deal, and who begins spending time with his neighbor, played by Maggie Cheung, whose husband also travels a great deal; as they put together that their spouses are having an affair, they also fall in love, to their mutual chagrin. The film is a masterpiece of tone, as is Leung’s performance—his ability to sit in front of the camera alone and move from desolation to lust to tenderness to quiet fury, just with his eyes, in a single scene, is mesmerizing. (Source:www.gq.com))

On Leung’s first day on the set of Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings, in Sydney, he emerged from his trailer, dressed and ready, and asked to have his chair put near the camera. Every day he repeated this process. “He would never be on his phone,” says Cretton. “He would just come and sit all day, watching everything that we’re doing—what shot we’re setting up, what we’re doing with the stand-ins. And by the time it was ready to go, I’d literally have nothing to tell him. Initially, I’d be like, ‘Okay, here’s what we’re thinking,’ and he’d say, ‘Oh,’ very politely, ‘yeah, I know. I’ve been watching this whole time.’ ” (Source: www.gq.com)

In some ways, it’s not surprising that Leung selected this multifaceted character to be his first Hollywood performance. In a 2000 interview, TIME asked the veteran actor if he received movie offers following his Best Actor win for Hong Kong director Wong Kar-wai’s In the Mood for Love at the Cannes Film Festival earlier that year. “I’ve had some from the U.S. and some from Europe. But the characters on offer are very restrictive and I don’t see why they have to be,” Leung said. “That’s why I prefer to work in Asia. You get more space to act, more roles.” (Source: time.com When it came time for Leung to shoot a scene (which has since been cut), Cretton says a reverent quiet descended across the set. It was a hot day, and for Leung it was even hotter; he was attired in the long robes and wig required to play Wenwu as a young thief, stealing cattle, in what becomes a massive battle scene. Immediately after the first cut, Cretton looked to Schwartz, the producer, and said, “I don’t even know what to go tell him, because we don’t have to do another take. There’s really no reason to.” (Source:www.gq.com))

In Mandarin, the term gu zhuang (古裝) refers to period costumes that actors wear in historical films and series. Leung has starred in a number of these projects, including playing a near-blind swordsman in Wong’s 1994 film Ashes of Time, which co-starred his wife, actor Carina Lau. The movie, along with many earlier TV shows Leung appeared in such as The Duke of Mount Deer (1984) and New Heavenly Sword and Dragon Sabre (1986), were adapted from or inspired by Louis Cha’s wuxia novels. Cha, also known by his pen name Jin Yong, was influential in shaping this genre of Chinese fiction featuring martial artists with superhuman abilities. (Source: time.com)

For Leung, it’s fate that brought the actor to the Marvel Cinematic Universe and, more broadly, Hollywood. Asked about his thoughts on building a career in Hollywood, he says, “I believe in destiny.” He explains: “You can’t force things to happen. If it happens in Hollywood, great. But then at the same time, leave it up to destiny to see what happens next.” (Source: time.com)

Fala Chen said that "You just suddenly get transfixed into his eyes" and noted that he would constantly think about his character and scenes that were shot weeks ago. Meng'er Zhang recalled that Leung never went back to his trailer until the day was done and never brought his phone to set. Jayden Zhang called him "one of the best actors that I've ever seen" and said, "He can be completely immersed inside of his character. And one time I even forgot, hey, is this a nice guy I met off set? Or is this super mean scary villain dad?" (Source: www.looper.com)

Despite Hollywood’s track record with Orientalism, however, I felt cautiously optimistic about Leung’s Hollywood debut, in the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s first Asian-led entry Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings. I must admit I screamed a little when Tony Leung’s bedroom eyes did their thing in the trailer (that look that passed between Leung and co-star Fala Chen seemed to contain a century’s worth of devotion). I knew then that I would have to make an effort to root for Simu Liu’s Shang-Chi, the titular hero to Leung’s anti-hero, when I finally watched the movie. Indeed, when American audiences meet Leung, he is outacting his co-star as a grief-stricken warlord whose humanity and monstrosity wrestle within him. At times it feels like director Destin Daniel Cretton has forgotten who his protagonist is, so moving is Leung’s portrayal of sorrow. (Source: www.vulture.com)

The fourth director is Wong Kar-Wai, whose In the Mood for Love (2000) is one of seven collaborations with Leung, about, as the late Roger Ebert describes, people “[who] are in the mood for love, but not in the time and place for it.” The film, which earned Leung the Best Actor award at Cannes, is famous for its evocative beauty on every level, so it’s difficult to choose just one instance of Leung setting the screen ablaze. But there is one short scene, set at the red-curtained hotel where Maggie Cheung and Tony Leung’s characters regularly meet — not to cheat on their respective unfaithful spouses, but to torture themselves and each other with desire. The film’s signature song, “Yumeji’s Theme,” is all we hear, beginning with steady plucks of strings, leading into a melody of one sad, isolated violin. (Source: www.vulture.com)

Hong Kong superstar Tony Leung first signed with an American agent back in 2005 but it wasn't until Marvel came calling that he finally decided to make his Hollywood film debut. He chalks that long delay up to “fate" but either way that means that Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings is the first time a broader American audiences might get a taste of something extraordinary Hong Kong cinema lovers have enjoyed for decades. Leung dug into his own history to transform a character that Marvel considered a sticky conundrum into one of the its most compelling villains. (Source: www.vanityfair.com Tony Leung. Set in 1960 in Hong Kong, the film follows Yuddy, a feckless ladies’ man, as he rejects the love of two women, as well as his foster mother, to seek his birth mother. Time first emerges as a major theme in Wong’s work… (Source:www.britannica.com))

Carina had just came off a humiliating experience of her own. Her ex-fiancee called off their wedding just weeks before the scheduled wedding day. Tony had recently broken up with Margie for the 3rd time. They were attracted to each other because they had suffered similar kind of losses. Both had plenty rocky relationships before and experienced enough hardships in life, Tony, a product of a broken family, and Carina, a mainlander trying to adapt in HK. For some reason, they bonded. (Source: www.china.org.cn Early in the film, audiences see Wenwu’s first encounter with Shang-Chi’s mother Ying Li (Fala Chen). The meet-cute takes the form of an intense martial battle. “It's a really interesting scene to shoot,” Leung said through a translator. “It almost feels like the animal instinct. How you meet each other for the first time and then the animals will fight and they tease and they'd get turned on. So that's the kind of relationship that I thought about in this scene.” (Source:www.vanityfair.com))

From 1989 to now, Tony and Carina had been going steady, except a few minor incidents. In 1993, Tony was rumored dating Valarie Chou after shooting a MTV with her. One time, Carina met Valarie at a movie premiere, and she refused to take picture with Valarie. However, eventually when the rumor cooled down, everything was back to normal. In 1994, Carina filed a law suit against her personal assistant for stealing her check. (Source: www.china.org.cn)

The HK East Touch Magazine took photos of Tony and Rosamund outside of a night bar on 3/7. Apparently, they were having a good time with a group of friends in the "97's bar". Later, Tony drove Rosamund home. Rosamund claims there is nothing going on with Tony. She is a good friend of Carina, and Tony simply gave her a ride home. Right after that, another rumored affair between Carina and a Taiwanese actor hit the stand, Tony claimed the rumor was ludicrous. All of things listed above were so-called "juicy" rumors, none had been proven true. Tony said many times before that he intended to get married whenever he felt like he wants to settle down. Apparently, that time hasn't come yet. We will just have to be patient and wait for that moment. (Source: www.china.org.cn)

After his father's departure, being the only man in the house, Tony felt the need to step up and protect the women of the house. He behaved himself and grew into a mature kid. His mother worked hard to keep him attending a private school, but without a strong financial support, Tony quit school after age 15. He wanted to ease the burden off his mother's shoulder. He started as a paper boy in his uncle's grocery store, then worked other jobs, such as selling air conditioners, fridges and washing machines. Tony was a close friend with Stephen Chiau at the time. Stephen used to talk to Tony about TVB training school and how he always wanted to become an actor. Tony wasn't interested initially, but later he sent in the application to tvb following Stephen's advice. (Source: www.china.org.cn)

It's also at this time, he met his sweetheart Margie Tsang. They met in tvb batch artistes training class in 1983. They were the most celebrated young lovers in mid 80's. Especially after "Police Cadet 85", they became the hottest couple on the screen as well as off the screen. They had broken up three times, each time was followed by a celebrated reunion. Their romance had kept everyone in suspense. However, the problems started when Tony reached the ultimate stardom after 1984. Tony's demanding schedule kept him busy on the shoot, and he seldom had time to spend with Margie. While Margie was gaining popularity after "Police Cadet 85", she too were busy shooting films and making new friends. Despite it all, they were still deeply in love. In a span of 4 years, they broke off and reunited three times, before finally calling off the relationship in 1989. (Source: www.china.org.cn)

In mid of 1988, Tony had a chance to work with Margie again on "Police Cadet 1988". To no one's surprise, they were fallen in love once again. So, where did this leave Kitty? Tony had not given her any explanations, and hadn't dated her for weeks. He had hoped that Kitty would understand it was a sign of breakup, but he couldn't face her to tell the truth. In short, Tony left Kitty alone to face the humiliation of the press. In all fairness, he had deeply hurt a very lovely and sweet girl. Facing this agonizing defeat, all Kitty could do was to swallow the pain and stay strong. Even though many people wanted to blame Tony for this messy situation, however, they were also happy to see Tony and Margie finally getting back together. Now with everyone's blessing, Tony and Margie were back together for the third time, but it didn't last very long. By the end of 1988, Tony and Margie were officially separated for the last time. (Source: www.china.org.cn In mid of 1988, Tony had a chance to work with Margie again on "Police Cadet 1988". To no one's surprise, they were fallen in love once again. So, where did this leave Kitty? Tony had not given her any explanations, and hadn't dated her for weeks. He had hoped that Kitty would understand it was a sign of breakup, but he couldn't face her to tell the truth. In short, Tony left Kitty alone to face the humiliation of the press. In all fairness, he had deeply hurt a very lovely and sweet girl. Facing this agonizing defeat, all Kitty could do was to swallow the pain and stay strong. Even though many people wanted to blame Tony for this messy situation, however, they were also happy to see Tony and Margie finally getting back together. Now with everyone's blessing, Tony and Margie were back together for the third time, but it didn't last very long. By the end of 1988, Tony and Margie were officially separated for the last time. (Source:www.china.org.cn))

Tony was a very dedicated actor, but he often worked himself into exhaustion trying to perfect his performance. He was always a perfectionist. Sometimes, he went too hard on himself. As the pressure built up, he often released himself into alcohol. During his darkest days, he spent days shooting movies, then nights in the bars. He had trouble to keep himself sober. He was making a habit of self-destruction. Alcohol had ruined everything he ever wanted to achieve. He was losing control of his life. Those were the days of being wild. He didn't pursue his career with same kind of aggressiveness that he had displayed in tvb. He became a lost man without a goal in life. Many times, he failed to capitalize his talent, and let opportunities slip by him. (Source: www.china.org.cn Tony became famous when he was very young. Being famous, every bit of his mistakes were magnified 10 times greater under the microscope. When his relationship with Kitty/Margie reached to an epic level, it became the daily gossips of the newspaper. His stardom did not settle easy with him, he was struggling within himself. He was leery of all the attentions he had attracted. In short, he was living in fish bowl, paying a price for being rich and famous. As a kid who grew up without a father, he suffered the most ill effected self-esteem and self-abandonment. (Source:www.china.org.cn))

Here is my extremely non-definitive list of 12 all-time great Leung films and performances, presented in no particular order and as a series of double bills (with links to streaming platforms where you can watch them, although some are available only on DVD). It omits some of my personal favorites and perhaps some of yours. But for those encountering Leung for the first time in “Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings” and eager to see more, all of these should be considered essential viewing. (Source: www.latimes.com As it happens, both Tony Leung Chiu-wai and Tony Leung Ka-fai appeared in Wong’s “Ashes of Time,” a shimmering, enigmatic swordplay drama that was under-appreciated in its initial mid-’90s tour of festivals and art-house theaters. (The significantly reworked “Ashes of Time Redux” was released in 2008.) While neither “Ashes” nor Zhang Yimou’s ravishing martial-arts epic “Hero” features Leung (Chiu-wai) at his deepest, they are tributes to his matinee-idol magnetism and his ability to slip effortlessly into period roles, especially if there’s radiantly windswept hair involved. Just watch him do floor calligraphy in “Hero” and tell me you don’t want to see the rest. (Source:www.latimes.com))

A cop comedy and a cop drama par excellence. In Wong’s joyous diptych “Chungking Express,” Leung plays a lovelorn police officer who’s plainly terrible at detecting things, like the fact that the woman of his dreams (Faye Wong) is secretly raiding and redesigning his apartment when he’s out, in the mother of all romantic pranks. (The movie, a personal all-time favorite, also offers delightful proof that Leung has more chemistry with stuffed animals than some actors can manage with each other.) He’s smarter and sadder as a cop who goes deep undercover in Andrew Lau and Alan Mak’s tense and soulful gangster thriller “Infernal Affairs,” which Martin Scorsese famously remade, to entertaining but lesser effect, as “The Departed.” (Source: www.latimes.com)

Justin Chang has been a film critic for the Los Angeles Times since 2016. He is the author of the book “FilmCraft: Editing” and serves as chair of the National Society of Film Critics and secretary of the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn. (Source: www.latimes.com)

CAREER

In addition to his acting career, Tony is a very popular recording artist. Although he carefully chooses his more serious roles, he also continues to appear in farces and B-movies, making him the hardest actor in Hong Kong to pigeonhole. (Source: www.china.org.cn)

L: My goal is for you to get pleasure from what I do. Just like when I started my acting career, I always got pleasure after I finished a film. The pleasure was hard to describe. (Source: www.china.org.cn One of the pleasures of “Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings” is that it’s fully aware of what a star it has in Leung and even seems to pay tribute to him, and to his work in these two remarkable Wong films in particular. In “In the Mood for Love,” he plays a 1960s writer who falls for his across-the-hall neighbor (the great Maggie Cheung); in “2046,” he plays that same man (or does he?), a chivalrous soul turned unrepentant cad, forever ruined by the memory of his great, lost love. I don’t know if these are Leung’s two greatest performances, but they are the ones I can’t imagine his career without, the ones in which this famed heartthrob, whether luxuriating in whorls of cigarette smoke or whispering a sacred secret, becomes as much the desirer as the desired, an avatar of obsessive longing to rival James Stewart in “Vertigo.” (Source:www.latimes.com))

The preeminent Hong Kong actor of his generation and one of international cinema’s greatest stars, Tony Leung Chiu Wai, now 59, moves with the smoldering, understated charm of an old-world matinee idol. His performances often make his films feel like their own genre, whether they’re kung fu sagas, police dramas, or film noir love stories. And over the past four decades, he’s been a muse to some of Asia’s greatest directors, among them Ang Lee, John Woo, Andrew Lau, and his friend and frequent collaborator Wong Kar Wai. Wong’s films, in particular, set the tone for Leung’s career; the pencil mustache and debonair personality he cultivated for a role in the filmmaker’s surreal epic 2046 earned him a nickname that tried to translate his charm for Western audiences: Asia’s Clark Gable. (Source: www.gq.com Leung is both moved and amused by what his arrival in Hollywood already means to his fans back home in Hong Kong. “Since my career began in TV shows in the ’80s,” he says, “a lot of my fans are moms and dads or grandmas, grandpas, and a lot of those people treat me as their own son. It’s like, ‘Oh, you went to study overseas and to a very famous college. Good for you. I’m really happy for you. I’m proud of you.’ ” (Source:www.gq.com))

GOOD

After quitting his studies, Leung worked in a variety of jobs, first as a grocer's runner at his uncle's shop, then a showroom salesman in a Hong Kong shopping centre. Around the age of 16 he met future actor and comedian Stephen Chow who influenced his decision to become an actor and remains a good friend. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

"Will Tony Leung make a good villain in Marvel's Shang-Chi? Take a look back at 8 of his best films for clues". 27 June 2018. (Source: en.wikipedia.org Leung has been in the film industry for more than 30 years, starring in a variety of roles. His debut film was Burning of the Imperial Palace (1983), where he played the Xianfeng Emperor. He would later work with Chow Yun-fat in three films, Prison on Fire (1987), A Better Tomorrow 3 (1989), and God of Gamblers Returns (1994). He also appeared as Joyce Godenzi's husband in She Shoots Straight, Joyce's trademark film. (Source:en.wikipedia.org))

Leung is both moved and amused by what his arrival in Hollywood already means to his fans back home in Hong Kong. “Since my career began in TV shows in the ’80s,” he says, “a lot of my fans are moms and dads or grandmas, grandpas, and a lot of those people treat me as their own son. It’s like, ‘Oh, you went to study overseas and to a very famous college. Good for you. I’m really happy for you. I’m proud of you.’ ” (Source: www.gq.com Despite Leung’s dozens of award nominations and wins in Hong Kong and reputation as a legendary performer in Asian cinema, his mindset as a perfectionist is clear as we close our video call on the note of success. “I never really consider myself as successful because I always look back and think that there must be something that I could do better,” Leung says. (Source:time.com))

But his darker, more morally conflicted turns in 2002’s Infernal Affairs — the inspiration for Martin Scorsese’s The Departed — and, especially, Ang Lee’s 2007 film Lust, Caution might be the better indicator of what to expect from Leung in Shang-Chi. Neither of those films is remotely kid-friendly, but in Wenwu that blend of sex, romance, and violence also courses underneath the surface of Marvel’s PG-13 superhero film. (Source: www.vanityfair.com Then there is Ang Lee, whose espionage masterpiece Lust, Caution (2007) gives us Leung’s turn as Mr. Yee, a Chinese high official betraying his country to Japanese invaders. It’s his only truly villainous role prior to playing Wenwu in Shang-Chi. Even so, Leung manages to make Mr. Yee someone for whom we’d betray our country, if he’d only look at us like we were the only good thing in his life. Throughout the film, Leung telegraphs the character’s personal capacity for cruelty. Mr. Yee’s suave manners are constantly veined with a cold menace. He’s a snake — smooth, coiled, poised to strike — and each of his visits to the mah-jongg table alongside blinged-out housewives plays like a viper gliding through a chicken coop. (Source:www.vulture.com))

The HK East Touch Magazine took photos of Tony and Rosamund outside of a night bar on 3/7. Apparently, they were having a good time with a group of friends in the "97's bar". Later, Tony drove Rosamund home. Rosamund claims there is nothing going on with Tony. She is a good friend of Carina, and Tony simply gave her a ride home. Right after that, another rumored affair between Carina and a Taiwanese actor hit the stand, Tony claimed the rumor was ludicrous. All of things listed above were so-called "juicy" rumors, none had been proven true. Tony said many times before that he intended to get married whenever he felt like he wants to settle down. Apparently, that time hasn't come yet. We will just have to be patient and wait for that moment. (Source: www.china.org.cn)

L: I've never been satisfied with any film that I've starred in. I always think my next film will be better. I guess it's motivation for me to improve. (Source: www.china.org.cn)

L: I've never been satisfied with any film that I've starred in. I always think my next film will be better. I guess it's motivation for me to improve. (Source: www.china.org.cn)

FESTIVAL

It is with Wong Kar-wai that Tony has enjoyed his strongest, most durable collaboration, having appeared in five of the writer/director's seven features. Following a cameo appearance in Days of Being Wild (1991), portrayals for Wong have been a wandering knight gradually going blind (in Ashes of Time [1994], for which he won several awards); a solitary policeman in love (in Chungking Express [1994], for which he received the Best Actor award at the Hong Kong Film Awards); and a homosexual facing exile and a painful separation (in Happy Together [1997], for which he again received the Best Actor award at the Hong Kong Film Awards). For his performance in In the Mood for Love, Tony received the Best Actor award at the Cannes International Film Festival. Tony has begun work on Wong Kar-wai's next film, 2046. (Source: www.china.org.cn As it happens, both Tony Leung Chiu-wai and Tony Leung Ka-fai appeared in Wong’s “Ashes of Time,” a shimmering, enigmatic swordplay drama that was under-appreciated in its initial mid-’90s tour of festivals and art-house theaters. (The significantly reworked “Ashes of Time Redux” was released in 2008.) While neither “Ashes” nor Zhang Yimou’s ravishing martial-arts epic “Hero” features Leung (Chiu-wai) at his deepest, they are tributes to his matinee-idol magnetism and his ability to slip effortlessly into period roles, especially if there’s radiantly windswept hair involved. Just watch him do floor calligraphy in “Hero” and tell me you don’t want to see the rest. (Source:www.latimes.com))

Leung is known for his collaborations with director Wong Kar-wai, with whom he has worked in seven films including Chungking Express (1994), Happy Together (1997), In the Mood for Love (2000), and The Grandmaster (2013). He also appeared in three Venice Film Festival Golden Lion-winning films, including A City of Sadness (1989), Cyclo (1995) and Lust, Caution (2007), directed by Ang Lee. Leung also stars in the Academy Award-nominated film Hero, and the box office hits Hard Boiled (1992) and Infernal Affairs (2002). He later came to prominence in Hollywood with his role as Xu Wenwu in the Marvel Cinematic Universe film Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings (2021). (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Tony Leung Chiu-wai (Chinese: 梁朝偉, born 27 June 1962) is a Hong Kong actor and singer. He is one of Asia's most successful and internationally recognised actors, and was named as "Small Tiger" among the Five Tiger Generals of TVB. He has won many international acting prizes, including the Cannes Film Festival award for Best Actor for his performance in Wong Kar-wai's film In the Mood for Love. He was named by CNN as one of "Asia's 25 Greatest Actors of All Time". (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

 

 

Related Articles