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Tag alder

Tag alder

Tag alder

Tag Alder is a small, deciduous tree that may grow 10 to 15 feet tall. It can be found naturally in wet areas including streambanks and bogs. The leaves are alternate with a wavy, toothed margin and hairy underside. The bark is smooth and gray-brown with a fluted appearance. In late winter, slim, green, male flowers and red, female flowers mature. The small tree produces a seed that matures in the fall and persists through the winter.

Alder

Speckled alder grows throughout Wisconsin in wet soils and full sun to very light shade. It is the namesake of a type of wetland known as "alder thicket". It is also found in or adjacent to sedge meadows, shrub carr and swamps, along streams and in roadside ditches. It sometimes aggressively colonizes cut-over northern conifer swamps, as appears to be the case in many dense alder stands along small streams in northern Wisconsin. Wisconsin plants of this species belong to the subspecies rugosa and were long known as Alnus rugosa (DuRoi (Spreng.) in the Midwest and that name is likely to be found in many of the botanical books for this area. The largest individual of Alnus incana known in the state of Wisconsin is located in Brown County. With a few exceptions, alders are deciduous, and the leaves are alternate, simple, and serrated. The flowers are catkins with elongate male catkins on the same plant as shorter female catkins, often before leaves appear; they are mainly wind-pollinated, but also visited by bees to a small extent. These trees differ from the birches (Betula, another genus in the family) in that the female catkins are woody and do not disintegrate at maturity, opening to release the seeds in a similar manner to many conifer cones.

Alders are commonly found near streams, rivers, and wetlands. Sometimes where the prevalence of alders is particularly prominent these are called alder carrs. In the Pacific Northwest of North America, the white alder (Alnus rhombifolia) unlike other northwest alders, has an affinity for warm, dry climates, where it grows along watercourses, such as along the lower Columbia River east of the Cascades and the Snake River, including Hells Canyon. 1.5 cm (5⁄8 in) long and one cm broad when mature in late autumn. The seeds are small, 1–2 mm (0.04–0.08 in) long, and light brown with a narrow encircling wing. The grey alder has a shallow root system, and is marked not only by vigorous production of stump suckers, but also by root suckers, especially in the northern parts of its range. The wood resembles that of the black alder (Alnus glutinosa), but is somewhat paler and of little economic value. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

 

 

 

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