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Sweet William Perennial

Sweet William Perennial

Sweet William Perennial

Sweet Williams, also known as dianthus barbatus, are rather unusual in that they grow as annuals in climates with cooler temperatures and perennials in warmer climates. The bad news is that they are relatively short-lived (even as perennials). The good news is that the plants often reseed themselves, eliminating the need to buy new ones for planting. Just leave the dried blooms in place.

Sweet

Sweet William (Dianthus barbutus) is a perennial flower that is widely planted as an annual or biennial. Sweet Williams are favorites for many home gardeners for their red, purple, white and violet bi-colored flowers and clove-like fragrance. Deadheading sweet Williams after each bloom lengthens the plant life and blooming season. If you do not deadhead sweet William plants, they will reseed and can take over a garden bed in a short amount of time. Deadheading refreshes your garden space and prevents the brown and shriveled flowers from blanketing your garden space.Shear the entire plant to about half its size with grass shears when the majority of the blooms are dead if you prefer not to deadhead individual blossoms. Plants that flower as profusely as sweet Williams require frequent deadheading when pruning each dead flower separately. Shearing allows you to deadhead all the flowers at once, while also controlling the size of overgrown plants and encouraging the flowers to bloom again.

John Gerard praises its beauty but omits any reference to medicinal uses. Its height makes it convenient for flower arrangements. In the Victorian language of flowers, sweet william symbolizes gallantry. The plant is widely used in borders, rock gardens and informal country cottage style gardens. Sweet William is a good candidate for a naturalistic garden because its nectar attracts birds, bees, and butterflies. Its flowers are considered edible. With their small clusters of flowers, Sweet Williams offer a splash of color right through the summer. Under the correct conditions, these biennials can bloom from May through to October in their flowering year. Their bright range of colors includes reds, pinks, whites, purples, and variegates. Some flowers are fragrant, but many cultivars are scentless. Their fringed and bearded petals are what give them their alternative "bearded pink" name. (Source: www.thespruce.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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