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suzanne somers

suzanne somers

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At seventy-three years young, #1 New York Times bestselling author and health guru Suzanne Somers has established herself as a leading voice on antiaging. With A New Way to Age, she “is at the forefront again, bringing seminal information to people, written in a way that all can understand” (Ray Kurzweil, author of How to Create a Mind) with this revolutionary philosophy for a longer and better-quality life that will make you feel like you’ve just had the best checkup ever.

Most of us are far too comfortable with the present paradigm of aging, which normalizes pills, nursing homes, and “the big three”: heart disease, cancer, and Alzheimer’s disease. But you don’t have to accept this fate. Now there’s a new way to grow older—with vibrancy, freedom, confidence, and a rockin’ libido. This health bible from Suzanne Somers will explain how to stop aging like your parents and embrace cutting-edge techniques such as: balancing nutritional and mineral deficiencies; detoxifying your gut for weight loss; pain management with non-THC cannabis instead of harmful opioids; and much more. (Source: www.amazon.com)

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Before the feud with ABC and Three's Company producers had ended, rival network CBS knew that Somers was ultimately going to be available. They signed her to a contract and a development deal for her own sitcom, to be called The Suzanne Somers Show, in which she was to play an "over-the-top" airline stewardess. Once she was indeed available (after her firing from Three's Company), CBS gave Somers – and the public – a time frame in which to expect the show to hit the air, but due to a change in administration at CBS' entertainment division in early 1982, executives ended up passing on the project. In her book After the Fall (1998) Somers said the producers of Three's Company kept sending cease and desist forms to CBS stating that Somers could not use any of her Chrissy Snow characterization, which she said chilled the creative process.

The second nude pictorial by Richard Fegley appeared in December 1984 in an attempt by Somers to regain her diminished popularity after the Three's Company debacle in 1981. Despite her anger and the earlier lawsuit, Playboy approached her earlier that year to pose nude a second time. Initially she was angered again, but eventually agreed after discussing it with her family. She felt she would have a better chance to control the quality of the photos the second time, and having such control was an important condition that Somers attached to posing. Despite Somers' earlier belief that her son would not want to see his mother nude, her then 18-year-old son did view the second pictorial. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

 

 

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