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Stylophorum diphyllum

Stylophorum diphyllum

Stylophorum diphyllum

Stylophorum diphyllum is an herbaceous perennial. It grows to about 1.5 feet (0.46 m) tall, from underground rhizomes. Leaves are pinnately cut and lobed. They grow from the base of the plant, and in a pair at the top of the flowering stems. Apart from its normal sap, Stylophorum diphyllum produces a yellow-orange latex that stains.

Diphyllum

Twoleaf nightshades also known as twinleaf nightshades, twin-leaved nightshades, two-leaf nightshades, and other variations. The specific epithet 'diphyllum' means "two leaf", referring to the arrangement of their leaves. They also known by other common names like tomatillo (not to be confused with the edible Physalis philadelphica), amatillo, and 黄果龙葵 (Huang guo long kui). There are two other species in the genus (S. lasiandrum and S. sutchuenense), both from China, but neither are readily available or as ornamental as S. diphyllum. The similar Celandine (Chelidonium majus), also in the poppy family, is a somewhat weedy European biennial that has smaller flowers (¾” across or less) that bloom in summer and hairless, erect seed capsules.

Solanum diphyllum is most similar to S. malacothrix, a rare species from western Mexico. The two species share small flowers with reflexed petals at anthesis and berries borne on erect pedicels. Solanum diphyllum differs from S. malacothrix in its glabrous foliage. The mature fruit of S. malacothrix is not known (see discussion under that species). In Mexico and Central America Solanum diphyllum is remarkably uniform morphologically and is usually easily recognizable. A single geographical variant occurs in Pacific coastal Chiapas. In the municipalities of Arriaga and Cintalapa, near the Mar Muerto on the Pacific coast and somewhat inland, plants of a narrow-leaved race of S. diphyllum are common. Plants from this area have leaves that average 1 cm wide, but otherwise they conform to the other characters of S. diphyllum. Naming this minor variant would obscure its relationship to the rest of the species range. (Source: solanaceaesource.myspecies.info)

 

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