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Sporobolus heterolepis illinois

Sporobolus heterolepis illinois

Sporobolus heterolepis illinois

Etymology: Sporobolus from the Greek sporo = seed and ballein = to throw, referring to the free seeds in many species of this genus that are sometimes forcibly ejected when the usually mucilaginous fruit wall dries; heterolepis from the Greek heteros = different and lepis = scale, referring to the unequal, scale like glumes of this species.

Heterolepis

Sporobolus heterolepis is native to lowland and upland prairies. It can be found along the borders of woods, roadsides, and swamps. Experience with these grasses in Holland suggests that they by no means need hot, dry positions, but good drainage is certainly very important. It is easily grown in average, well drained soils in full sun. The grass is tolerant of a wide range of soil types, including heavy clays and is heat and drought tolerant once establishedSporobolus heterolepis grows in lowland and upland prairies, along the borders of woods, roadsides, and swamps, and in north-facing swales. It is restricted to the Flora region and is associated with many plant communities. It is also available commercially as an ornamental.

Sporobolus heterolepis grows at elevations of 40-2250 m, in lowland and upland prairies, along the borders of woods, roadsides, and swamps, and in north-facing swales. It is associated with many plant communities, and is also available commercially as an ornamental. It is restricted to the Flora region.One of the very best of our native prairie grasses is Sporobolus heterolepis (Prairie Dropseed). Prairie Dropseed, native to the mid-section of the US and Canada, has much to recommend it. A warm-season bunch grass (grows in a clump and doesn't run with underground stolons) with finely textured, arching foliage and tan colored sprays of summer flowers, it grows readily in sun and part sun in a variety of soils and moisture levels. (Source: www.highcountrygardens.com)

 

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