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Snakes in georgia

Snakes in georgia

Snakes in georgia

As anyone who has been bitten by a snake will tell you, the first question to ask is whether it is venomous. But that is only one question out of many that you might want to ask about the snake. So where do you go when you want to find out about the Georgia snakes? All in all, a user’s first goal will be to identify the snake species.

Snake

Some Georgia nonvenomous snake species are often misidentified as copperheads, the state’s most common venomous species. The two top images in this collage are copperheads. Nonvenomous snakes sometimes confused for copperheads include (left to right, second row) northern watersnake and corn snake; (third row) brown snake and gray rat snake; and, (bottom row) juvenile black racer and juvenile black rat snake. Photo credits: copperhead (top left), northern watersnake and black racer – Dirk J. Stevenson. Juvenile black rat snake – Greg C. Greer. Others: John Jensen/GaDNR .There are six venomous snake species in Georgia (Copperhead, Pigmy Rattlesnake, Timber Rattlesnake, Cottonmouth, Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake, Eastern Coral Snake), and 39 non-venomous snake species. Most snakes you see will likely be non-venomous. That’s just math.

But according to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources' wildlife division, of the 46 snake species known in the state, six are actually venomous. And of those six, experts say snakebites from only three — the timber rattlesnake, Eastern diamondback and cottonmouth — are realistically threatening. The copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) is much more common in the metro Atlanta area compared to the others on this list. According to the UGA SREL Herpetology Program, they're fairly big, heavy-bodied snakes with large triangular heads, tan/brown bodies showing dark hourglass-like crossbands along their length. An average adult copperhead grows to 24 to 40 incThe snakes range throughout the eastern and central U.S. but are not in most of Florida and south-central Georgia. Copperheads can be found in a wide variety of habitats, proving as comfortable in dry, rocky areas as they are in cool, forested areas or wetlands. Populations also often persist in suburban neighborhoods with patches of forest.(Source:www.ajc.com)

 

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