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Should I Dry Seeds Before Planting

Should I Dry Seeds Before Planting

Should I Dry Seeds Before Planting

If you’re expecting to plant in the ground this season, you need to remember a few basics first. Fertilizing, watering, and weed control are serious problems for those who need to be mindful when dealing with seeds in the garden. If your seeds have any dry time, it would be smart to dry them before you start planting.In my opinion, starting plants from seed is the most rewarding thing to do as a gardener. Not only is it economical, but planting from seed, especially seed that you saved from your own plants, can provide healthy organic plants for the garden. However, it is important to remember that when saving seeds you save them from mature/ripe plants/fruits.

Seeds

The first seed-drying method requires no special tools or equipment. Once the seed pods or fruits have been harvested from the plant, crack them open and collect the seeds. If the seeds came from a “wet” fruit or vegetable, such as a cucumber, tomato, pepper or squash, wash off the “slime” according to these instructions. If the seeds came from a “dry” seed pod or capsule, like a zinnia, marigold, parsley or cosmos plant, you can skip this step. When it comes to learning how to dry seeds, gardeners can’t forget how useful a simple brown paper lunch bag can be. This technique is best used for dry seed pods and capsules, but it should not be used for saving seeds of wet fruits, such as tomatoes, squash, peppers, melons and the like. I find it especially useful for flower seeds and for dry vegetable and herb seeds borne on stalks, like those from lettuce, carrot, spinach and dill plants.

To dry seeds using silica gel, prepare the seeds accordingly to separate them from their fruits or pods. Once the seeds are separated, weigh them. Place the same amount by weight of silica gel into the bottom of a glass screw-top jar. Place a small piece of screening on top of the silica gel and then place the seeds on top of the screening. Spread them out as much as possible so they sit in a thin layer. Put the lid of the jar and keep it sealed for 7 to 10 days. Large seeds, like squash and pumpkins, might need a few more days. After soaking the seeds and transplanting them, be sure to keep the soil moist continuously for the first few weeks of growth. While your seeds are in this tender and young state, they can’t dry out without the risk of dying. While young, their roots only extend a few inches deep into the soil and they need moisture near the soil level. After they become established, you can begin to water less frequently and prepare to enjoy the fruits of your garden! (Source: www.epicgardening.com)

 

 

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