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Shade Loving Bushes Zone 8

Shade Loving Bushes Zone 8

Shade Loving Bushes Zone 8

Beginners researching shade garden plants for U.S. Department of Agriculture hardiness zones 4 to 8 need reassurance that they are not doomed to settle for dark, dreary, dismal, and dull. This list of shady-but-colorful characters should dispel any notion you may harbor that your landscaping is in any way cursed simply because a significant portion of it is not drenched in sunshine all day long.

Shade

Shade-tolerant: A plant is said to tolerate partial shade if, while it prefers more sunlight, it can also be used in partial shade. But the "tolerant" label can be deceiving, because the plant's performance in a shade garden may fall far short of what you are used to seeing it do in full sun: Its floral or foliar display may be negatively impacted to an unacceptable degree. It is often preferable to treat such specimens as full-sun plants, even though, technically, you can grow them in shade. If you’re a gardener or homeowner with a lot of shade on your property, you may find yourself struggling to find plants that thrive and bloom with minimal sunlight, especially when it comes to shrubs. While there are many colorful flowering perennials and annuals for shade, there are far fewer shrubs with vivid blooms for shady conditions. Today, I’d like to introduce you to 16 flowering shrubs for shade to fill your landscape with color from early spring through fall. There’s even a shrub for shade that blooms in the winter on this list!

The next group is not a botanical classification but based, rather, on the outstanding characteristic of the plants in question: their extraordinary leaves. They are known as "foliage plants" because their foliage is superb enough to make them useful as landscape plants, despite lacking flowers of any great beauty. They are especially useful in shaded locations, where many plants valued for their blooms in sunnier spots simply will not flower much when robbed of the necessary sunshine. Here are some examples that can take at least a little shade: A wide-spreading, 6-foot-tall, North American native shrub for shade, oakleaf hydrangea deserves a home in every shady landscape. Even in the winter the peeling bark of the oakleaf hydrangea is deserving of our attention. The large, oak leaf-like leaves turn an amazing orange and then a deep burgundy in the autumn. Large, cone-shaped panicles of creamy white flowers are produced from the woody stems in summer. The merits of this shrub for shade cannot be stressed enough. It’s a personal favorite for its four-season interest. Hardy to -20 degrees F. (Source: savvygardening.com)

 

 

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