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Rudbeckia

Rudbeckia

Rudbeckia

I have two Rudbeckia plants side by side in a shoreland planting. Seeded at different times, same native supplier. Both identified as Rudbeckia initially, but I don't have the tags now. One has leaves that are flat and some toothing at edge. It has a yellow orange flower and more cone shaped center. The other one has a slightly thick hairy leave that is more elipticle and the color is more yellow, has both disk and conical center. Are they just variations or different species.

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I have two Rudbeckia plants side by side in a shoreland planting. Seeded at different times, same native supplier. Both identified as Rudbeckia initially, but I don't have the tags now. One has leaves that are flat and some toothing at edge. It has a yellow orange flower and more cone shaped center. The other one has a slightly thick hairy leave that is more elipticle and the color is more yellow, has both disk and conical center. Are they just variations or different species.Common Wood Sedge, Carex blanda, is one of the most ubiquitous native woodland plants. This lush yet tough plant is often seen growing next to paths indicating that it is well adapted to disturbed and compacted soils and that its seeds are spread via mud stuck to the bottom of shoes, paws, and hooves. The seeds may also be distributed by woodland ants. The leaves and seeds of native Carex are an important sources of food for wildlife.

As one of handful of sedges that can thrive in disturbed areas this sedge plays an important role in protecting soil and providing food for wildlife, especially wildlife that co-evolved with the North American Carex species. A number of birds including turkey, grouse, woodcock, and songbirds eat the seeds as do grey squirrels and white footed mice. Rabbits and deer consume its leaves and stems as well as a wide variety of insects, some of them Carex specialists. To see a list of 14 different moth and butterfly caterpillars that need native sedges for food click here.A Prairie Moon • February 7 Thanks for writing, Anita. There are more than 5,000 species in the sedge genus (Carex or Cyperaceae) worldwide, so generalizations are problematic. That said, sedges have the reputation of being hardy, long-lived perennial components of the understory of native plant communities. Their seeds persist viably in seed banks for years, so established populations of species like Carex blanda are reliably perennial components of the landscape for many seasons. (Source: www.prairiemoon.com)

 

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