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Rose Wild the Times

Rose Wild the Times

Rose Wild the Times

Louise S. O’Connor, a descendant of Victor Marion Rose, has mined family records and recorded family traditions about “Uncle Vic.” She carefully reviewed Rose’s collected papers, both in her personal possession and in the archives of the Briscoe Center for American History and other repositories. Wild Rose provides an intimate portrait of a complicated individual who, despite his frequently unsuccessful struggles with his demons, nevertheless left an important mark on Texas history and letters. “Louise O’Conner’s Wild Rose is an engrossing account of the life of Victor Marion Rose, a complex personality who is an important, but little known figure in the cultural and social history of 19th century Texas. It is a wild, fascinating, and enjoyable read. Highly recommended!” —Don Carleton, executive director, Briscoe Center for American History.

Wild

John H. Jenkins mentions Rose three times in Basic Texas Books, but never as an author in his own right. In Texas literature and history Rose has always been, as the author notes in her preface, “something of a shadowy figure” (xvii). Wild Rose is O’Connor’s effort to bring him out of the shadows, to illuminate the reasons for his having been there, and to rehabilitate his reputation as a journalist, writer, and scholar whose legacy is “an amazing assessment of the Old South and its way of life” (1).Louise S. O’Connor, a descendant of Victor Marion Rose, has mined family records and recorded family traditions about “Uncle Vic.” She carefully reviewed Rose’s collected papers, both in her personal possession and in the archives of the Briscoe Center for American History and other repositories. Wild Rose provides an intimate portrait of a complicated individual who, despite his frequently unsuccessful struggles with his demons, nevertheless left an important mark on Texas history and letters.

John H. Jenkins mentions Rose three times in Basic Texas Books, but never as an author in his own right. In Texas literature and history Rose has always been, as the author notes in her preface, “something of a shadowy figure” (xvii). Wild Rose is O’Connor’s effort to bring him out of the shadows, to illuminate the reasons for his having been there, and to rehabilitate his reputation as a journalist, writer, and scholar whose legacy is “an amazing assessment of the Old South and its way of life” (1).When taken by mouth: Rose hip extract is likely safe when consumed in amounts found in foods. Rose hip from Rosa canina is also likely safe when used in larger amounts as medicine. Rose hip that comes from Rosa damascena is possibly safe when taken in larger amounts as medicine. There isn't enough reliable information to know if rose hip from other types of rose is safe in medicinal amounts. Rose hip can cause some side effects, such as diarrhea. (Source: www.webmd.com)

 

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