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Rocky 4

Rocky 4

Rocky 4

In this sci-fi action movie from Sylvester Stallone, four back-country miners find a map that will lead them to a fortune in a buried spaceship.

ACTION

The film has a 44% approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes, from 52 critics, indicating mixed reviews; the critical consensus states, "Rocky IV inflates the action to absurd heights, but it ultimately rings hollow thanks to a story that hits the same basic beats as the first three entries in the franchise." (Source: en.wikipedia.org

Lee, Christina (2005). "Lock and Load(up): The Action Body in The Matrix". Continuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies. 19 (4): 560. doi:10.1080/10304310500322909. S2CID 143745508. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)Gates, P. (2010). "Acting His Age? The Resurrection of the 80s Action Heroes and their Aging Stars". Quarterly Review of Film and Video. 27 (4): 276–289. doi:10.1080/10509200802371113. S2CID 192139757. (Source:en.wikipedia.org))

... Boxing in this version is much more realistic, also. The commentators, atmosphere, crowds, the way punches actually sound (yes, they sound like that in real life) and the knock outs are actually earned, take longer. If you compare a video of highlights from a (high action) boxing fight from this decade to the movie you'll see how I mean. Stallone makes it all seem much more plausible. -Those who miss the overly LOUD "thud" of the punches in the '85 version better watch a real boxing fight first because that was more fake than a fake Rolex from Compton. (Source: www.amazon.com ... Another welcome change is the dialogue, in its delivery. More realistic tones, less over dramatic yelling & new lines that actually remind you that these characters aren't 'action figures' but people who age, bleed & get tired. It also helps show the drive behind each character's actions. Not just: "you killed my friend, so now even if you're younger & indestructible, I'm giving up my title to avenge Apollo & Adrian will go along with it just 'cause that's how we roll." -Please. (Source:www.amazon.com))

www.amazon.com www.amazon.com))... Another welcome change is the dialogue, in its delivery. More realistic tones, less over dramatic yelling & new lines that actually remind you that these characters aren't 'action figures' but people who age, bleed & get tired. It also helps show the drive behind each character's actions. Not just: "you killed my friend, so now even if you're younger & indestructible, I'm giving up my title to avenge Apollo & Adrian will go along with it just 'cause that's how we roll." -... Boxing in this version is much more realistic, also. The commentators, atmosphere, crowds, the way punches actually sound (yes, they sound like that in real life) and the knock outs are actually earned, take longer. If you compare a video of highlights from a (high action) boxing fight from this decade to the movie you'll see how I mean. Stallone makes it all seem much more plausible. -Those who miss the overly LOUD "thud" of the punches in the '85 version better watch a real boxing fight first because that was more fake than a fake Rolex from Compton. (Source:Please. (Source:

FIGHT

Frustrated by the Soviets' cold indifference, Rocky decides to challenge Drago himself, but has to surrender his championship to do so. Drago's camp agrees to an unsanctioned 15-round fight in the Soviet Union on Christmas Day, an arrangement meant to protect Drago from the threats of violence he has been receiving in the United States. Rocky travels to the Soviet Union without his wife Adrian due to her disapproval of the match, setting up his training base in a remote cabin in Krasnogourbinsk with only Duke and Paulie to accompany him. Duke opens up to Rocky, stating that he actually raised Apollo and that his death felt like a father losing his son, and expresses his faith in Rocky that he will emerge victorious. To prepare for the match, Drago uses high-tech equipment, a team of trainers and doctors monitoring his every movement, and regular doses of anabolic steroids. Rocky, on the other hand, does roadwork in deep snow over mountainous terrain and workouts utilizing antiquated farm equipment. Adrian arrives unexpectedly to give Rocky her support, which gives Rocky a new vigor. (Source: en.wikipedia.org

Rocky gives a victory speech, acknowledging that the local crowd's disdain of him had turned to mutual respect during the fight. Rocky finally declares, "If I can change and you can change, everybody can change!" The Soviet premier stands up and reluctantly applauds Rocky, and his aides follow suit. Rocky ends his speech by wishing his son watching the match on TV a Merry Christmas, and raises his arms into the air in victory as the crowd applauds. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)The two boxers spend the next dozen rounds trading blows, with Rocky managing to continually hold his ground despite Drago's best efforts. As the 12th round begins, the previously hostile Soviet crowd suddenly start chanting and cheering for Balboa. After being berated by Koloff, Drago rebels, throwing him from the ring and directly addressing Gorbachev, stating he fights only for himself. In the final round, with both fighters exhausted, Rocky initially takes more punishment, but manages to stay on his feet. Both fighters trade blows, before Balboa seizes an opening, unleashing a series of vicious blows, eventually knocking out Drago and avenging Apollo's death. (Source:en.wikipedia.org))

Sylvester Stallone has stated that the original punching scenes filmed between him and Dolph Lundgren in the first portion of the fight are completely authentic. Stallone wanted to capture a realistic scene and Lundgren agreed that they would engage in legitimate sparring. One particularly forceful Lundgren punch to Stallone's chest slammed his heart against his breastbone, causing the heart to swell. Stallone, suffering from labored breathing and a blood pressure over 200, was flown from the set in Canada to Saint John's Regional Medical Center in Santa Monica, and was forced into intensive care for eight days. Stallone later commented that he believed Lundgren had the athletic ability and talent to fight in the professional heavyweight division of boxing. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Additionally, Stallone has stated that Lundgren nearly forced Carl Weathers to quit during the filming of the Apollo-vs.-Drago "exhibition" fight. At one point in the filming of the scene, Lundgren tossed Weathers into the corner of the boxing ring. Weathers shouted profanities at Lundgren while leaving the ring, and announcing that he was calling his agent and quitting the movie. Only after Stallone forced the two actors to reconcile did filming continue. The event caused a four-day work stoppage, while Weathers was talked back into the part and Lundgren agreed to tone down his aggressiveness. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Sportscaster Stu Nahan makes his fourth appearance in the series as commentator for the Creed–Drago fight. Warner Wolf replaces Bill Baldwin, who died following filming for Rocky III, as co-commentator. For the fight between Rocky and Drago, commentators Barry Tompkins and Al Bandiero portray themselves as USA Network broadcasters. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Ongoing editing ultimately pushed the release date, with Stallone finishing his editing sometime in January, 2021. In all, approximately 38 minutes of previously unreleased footage were added to the film, including significant extensions of both fight scenes and the Apollo Creed funeral scene. Conversely, a significant amount of footage was removed, as the director's cut runs 93 minutes compared to the original cut's 91 minutes. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Other scenes from the 1985 version removed in the new cut include Balboa celebrating his wedding anniversary with Adrian and the Soviet regime leaders applauding Rocky for his speech after winning the final fight. (Source: en.wikipedia.org Scenes with Brigitte Nielsen playing Ludmilla, Ivan Drago's wife, were also substantially diminished, particularly the bits where she spoke for her husband at press conferences and her encounter with Apollo Creed's wife in Las Vegas just before the tragic fight between Creed and Drago. Nielsen and Stallone were married in 1985, shortly after the film's premiere, and divorced in 1987, which perhaps explains Stallone's decision to now reduce the role of his ex-wife. (Source:en.wikipedia.org))

Sylvester Stallone decided that for the shooting of the fight, he and Dolph Lundgren should hit one another for real, so as to increase the intensity of the scene. After doing three takes of Rocky taking shots to ribs, Stallone felt a burning in his chest, but ignored it. Later that night, he had difficulty breathing and was taken to a nearby emergency room. It was discovered that his blood pressure was over 200, and he had to be flown on a low-altitude flight from Canada to St. John's Hospital in Santa Monica, where he remained in intensive care for four days. What had happened was that Lundgren had punched him so hard in the chest, Stallone's heart had slammed up against his breastbone and began to swell, cutting off the blood supply and restricting the oxygen flow throughout the body. (Source: www.imdb.com)

There are traces of it present in the theatrical cut — most notably Apollo’s speech when pleading for Rocky to support him in fighting the newcomer, Dolph Lundgren’s Drago (in a scene that features Stallone’s best writing since the first film: “Without some challenge, without some damn war to fight, then the warriors might as well be dead, Stallion”). With the film’s swelling lanced, the idea of a noble legacy, the warrior’s code, of what it demands, and of who, pushes to the fore. It’s given greater emotional resonance with snatches from Rocky II’s mournful 'Vigil' newly playing behind Apollo’s impassioned dialogue, and then expanded on with a previously unseen two-hander, showing Rocky’s reluctance and Apollo’s need. When Rocky finally agrees to stand in his corner one last time, it’s clearer than ever that he’s complicit in the tragedy that follows in the ring. (Source: www.empireonline.com It’s a much more sombre context for the film (and goes some way to recontextualising the first three outings) and serves to subdue its worst indulgences. Without the gills of excess breathing quite so hard, the story of Rocky then pledging to fight Drago in Russia on Christmas Day becomes clear: it’s not about solving the Cold War or even a simple revenge yarn wrapped in bombastic patriotism. Rocky needs to find a way to break free of the code. To find a way to change. Apollo couldn’t, it says now more explicitly, and he died because of it. (Source:www.empireonline.com))

Along with Stallone’s writing, the fight scenes were always the heart and pure power of a Rocky film. The choreography and commitment (Stallone claims he nearly died after being punched by Lundgren in IV) writ large on screen. Stallone manages to punch them up (ahem) with extra footage, increased intensity and better sound design. Crucially, Apollo regains a bit of dignity with the deadly Drago fight edited to allow something of a retaliation before he hits the canvas, body twitching. (Source: www.empireonline.com Stallone, though, has re-cut with serious intent (and intent to be serious), and this extends to the ‘enemy’, with the Soviets faring better overall this time around. The full-throttle jingoism is pared back and there’s a litany of favourable edits, some imperceptible to most — such as the moving of a scene with Mrs Drago (Brigitte Nielsen) nonchalantly sparking up a cigarette during the deadly fight to before a punch is landed, rather than when Apollo is bloodied and battered — seeking to round them out as actual human beings. (Source:www.empireonline.com))

A director’s cut that has much in common with The Godfather Coda, as Stallone doesn’t just throw in a few extra fight scenes but recrafts Rocky IV into a compelling character study. One with great montages. (Source: www.empireonline.com ... The exhibition: Creed vs. Drago. -The original version was a mess. In this cut, the fight is extended & builds up to its tragic end. Apollo actually has his moments of skill & holds his own, with the integrity his character deserved. And Drago isn't pictured as the "indestructible robot" we saw back in the 80s which seemed to kill Apollo with less than 24 punches & hardly broke a sweat. (Source:www.amazon.com))

... The big fight, Rocky's speech after & finale, all much much better, from my perspective. Extended & edited well, rather than cut off by music (after brief comments & a corny reference to "the kid") then credits rolling in the original... -not here. Until the final shot, it all fits well. (Source: www.amazon.com ... Boxing in this version is much more realistic, also. The commentators, atmosphere, crowds, the way punches actually sound (yes, they sound like that in real life) and the knock outs are actually earned, take longer. If you compare a video of highlights from a (high action) boxing fight from this decade to the movie you'll see how I mean. Stallone makes it all seem much more plausible. -Those who miss the overly LOUD "thud" of the punches in the '85 version better watch a real boxing fight first because that was more fake than a fake Rolex from Compton. (Source:www.amazon.com))

My first major problem was Sly's choice for the recap from Rocky III. He practically shows a huge chunk of footage from it, instead of the final fight montage we're used to. Most of it came from the scene in Mickey's gym between Rocky and Apollo. It took a little too long to get to the footage of the actual film. If the point was to emphasize Rocky and Apollo's friendship more, I thought the footage we had of them in IV was sufficient for that. (Source: www.amazon.com)

However, it is the second half of the film that I felt the film rose from the canvas and began to earn its entertainment value. Some of the alternate takes which favored Drago and Koloff instead of Ludmilla seemed to serve a story point: The first half of the Russians campaign, flattery and charm, is over; and now the next phase: hardness and threats, begins. The training sequence has some interesting alternate shots, but the real meat and potatoes is of course the fight itself. The extended, alternate sequences actually added to the experience and made the fight, if I may audaciously claim, even more entertaining than the original. I won't spoil things more other than sadly, the post fight sequence sort of ended things on a flat, uninspiring note, which the original did a much better job of handling. (Source: www.amazon.com ... The exhibition: Creed vs. Drago. -The original version was a mess. In this cut, the fight is extended & builds up to its tragic end. Apollo actually has his moments of skill & holds his own, with the integrity his character deserved. And Drago isn't pictured as the "indestructible robot" we saw back in the 80s which seemed to kill Apollo with less than 24 punches & hardly broke a sweat. (Source:www.amazon.com))

... The big fight, Rocky's speech after & finale, all much much better, from my perspective. Extended & edited well, rather than cut off by music (after brief comments & a corny reference to "the kid") then credits rolling in the original... -not here. Until the final shot, it all fits well. (Source: www.amazon.com ... Boxing in this version is much more realistic, also. The commentators, atmosphere, crowds, the way punches actually sound (yes, they sound like that in real life) and the knock outs are actually earned, take longer. If you compare a video of highlights from a (high action) boxing fight from this decade to the movie you'll see how I mean. Stallone makes it all seem much more plausible. -Those who miss the overly LOUD "thud" of the punches in the '85 version better watch a real boxing fight first because that was more fake than a fake Rolex from Compton. (Source:www.amazon.com))

However, it is the second half of the film that I felt the film rose from the canvas and began to earn its entertainment value. Some of the alternate takes which favored Drago and Koloff instead of Ludmilla seemed to serve a story point: The first half of the Russians campaign, flattery and charm, is over; and now the next phase: hardness and threats, begins. The training sequence has some interesting alternate shots, but the real meat and potatoes is of course the fight itself. The extended, alternate sequences actually added to the experience and made the fight, if I may audaciously claim, even more entertaining than the original. I won't spoil things more other than sadly, the post fight sequence sort of ended things on a flat, uninspiring note, which the original did a much better job of handling. (Source: www.amazon.com My first major problem was Sly's choice for the recap from Rocky III. He practically shows a huge chunk of footage from it, instead of the final fight montage we're used to. Most of it came from the scene in Mickey's gym between Rocky and Apollo. It took a little too long to get to the footage of the actual film. If the point was to emphasize Rocky and Apollo's friendship more, I thought the footage we had of them in IV was sufficient for that. (Source:www.amazon.com))

The most triumphant sports-drama franchise in history returns with a new look in ROCKY VS. DRAGO: THE ULTIMATE DIRECTOR’S CUT. This live event is coming to movie theaters for one night only and includes an introduction and Q&A with Sylvester Stallone! Director, Writer and star SYLVESTER STALLONE masterfully reshapes ROCKY IV, delivering 40 minutes of never-before-seen footage. With more intense fight scenes, world heavyweight champion Rocky Balboa (Stallone) defends his title once again, this time against Drago (Dolph Lundgren), a six-foot-four, 261-pound fighter who has the backing of the Soviet Union. (Source: www.fathomevents.com)

But let’s be clear: this is a ridiculous undertaking, a polish on a Cold War relic. For example, Stallone does not cut the sequence where Balboa speeds off into the night in his Lamborghini to Robert Tepper’s No Easy Way Out while flashing back to scenes from the first three Rocky movies. He merely attempts to add gravitas by converting those flashbacks from color to black-and-white. (Fans needn’t worry about the other montage sequences, though: Unlike Paulie’s robot, the two back-to-back training montages for the Drago fight are sacrosanct.) (Source: www.theguardian.com Rocky vs Drago succeeds to the tiniest degree in making the film feels like some semblance of a character study, rather than a rushed 90 minutes full of repurposed footage and fighting montages set to workout music by Survivor, John Cafferty, Touch, and composer Vince DiCola. The fighting sequences in the Rocky movies have always been a dream of what boxing might be like if it were more like a choreographed street brawl than a sport where defense is an option. Rocky’s strategy of waddling toward his opponent with his gloves down is like if Muhammad Ali’s rope-a-dope strategy involved exhausting a rival by having him punch you repeatedly in the face. (Source:www.theguardian.com))

All the Rocky movies are about overcoming odds through grit and determination, and they’re all seductive for that reason, especially when the odds are as great as Rocky fighting a machine-tooled Russian who’s a full foot taller and possessed of a lethal right hand. But even Stallone at the time seemed to realize that he’d exhausted the formula, and he handed over the reins to Rocky V to John G. Avildsen, who directed the original film, in an effort to rediscover the character’s lost soul. It didn’t work then for Rocky V. And it doesn’t work now for the unsalvageable Rocky IV. (Source: www.theguardian.com)

Stallone’s also gone back and inserted numerous alternate takes that completely alter Apollo’s tragic arc. Taking on Drago is no longer an act of stupid hubris, but an obligation, which is made clear in Duke’s eulogy wherein Creed’s trainer and default father eloquently defends his fighter’s fatal decision. “The Warrior has the right to choose his way of life and his way of death.” This echoes a newly added moment in Creed’s fight with Drago where Rocky pleads with his friend, “Don’t do this to me.” “I’m doing this for me,” snaps Apollo. This gives Rocky’s inevitable bout with Drago a deeper purpose than vengeance; he, too, is obeying the warrior’s code, and he doesn’t care if everyone, even Adrian, believes it’s an act of suicide. (Source: www.polygon.com So is Stallone’s new version, dubbed Rocky IV: Rocky vs. Drago, an improvement? In several cases, absolutely. As depicted in a re-making-of documentary currently available on YouTube, Stallone is aghast at the number of badly missed punches that made it into the 1985 theatrical cut. He’s proud of the final fight’s ferociousness (as he should be considering that a series of flush Lundgren punches to his chest left him with a swollen heart that landed him in the ICU), but in today’s blown-up HD world those occasional whiffs are glaringly obvious. In the recut, almost every punch lands with a realistic thud (although some of the absurdly jacked-up sound design has actually been dialed down). (Source:www.polygon.com))

How this squares with Drago’s reconfigured arc is tricky. In the theatrical cut, Drago’s late-fight rebellion against his handlers felt like the act of a petulant child (“I fight for me!”). In this version, Drago is portrayed as an awkwardly willing participant in Russian propaganda. He attempts to answer questions at the press conference, but is quickly interrupted by his chatterbox manager. There’s a human being underneath the robotic facade, and, thanks to Creed II, we know what his resistance will ultimately cost him. Unfortunately, Stallone’s eliminated Brigitte Nielsen’s indignant outburst where her sincere-sounding claims of death threats against her husband are laughed off by the media. There may be a slightly more human dimension to Drago in the director’s cut (his bewildered perspective during James Brown’s performance of “Living in America” is like a five-year-old kid getting lost in a carnival funhouse), but Nielsen’s apparatchik has been reduced to a cold-hearted caricature. This feels like an unfair tradeoff. (Source: www.polygon.com)

LIKE

How this squares with Drago’s reconfigured arc is tricky. In the theatrical cut, Drago’s late-fight rebellion against his handlers felt like the act of a petulant child (“I fight for me!”). In this version, Drago is portrayed as an awkwardly willing participant in Russian propaganda. He attempts to answer questions at the press conference, but is quickly interrupted by his chatterbox manager. There’s a human being underneath the robotic facade, and, thanks to Creed II, we know what his resistance will ultimately cost him. Unfortunately, Stallone’s eliminated Brigitte Nielsen’s indignant outburst where her sincere-sounding claims of death threats against her husband are laughed off by the media. There may be a slightly more human dimension to Drago in the director’s cut (his bewildered perspective during James Brown’s performance of “Living in America” is like a five-year-old kid getting lost in a carnival funhouse), but Nielsen’s apparatchik has been reduced to a cold-hearted caricature. This feels like an unfair tradeoff. (Source: www.polygon.com Given its remarkably slender narrative of 91 minutes, Rocky IV’s more training montage than movie. So when Stallone announced an “extended director’s cut” this past September, the notion sounded like grist for an SNL Digital Short. But the actor-director was deathly serious, and, now, so is Rocky IV. This once gaudy touchstone of ‘80s cinema has been transformed into a strangely grim rumination on the warrior’s code. Visually and tonally, it’s a much different experience. And let’s get this straight: those “42 minutes of new footage” promised in the press announcement are in there, but at 93 minutes (with credits), it also means a third of the movie that’s been a cable mainstay since the beginning of the glasnost era is gone. This is not your bearded Gen X uncle’s Rocky IV. (Source:www.polygon.com))

Do I feel this was a necessary remake? No, I didn't feel like this was something that needed to be done. If anything, this was something for some reason, Stallone felt like needed to be done, possibly because he'd grown very bored over the course of the pandemic and lack of films being made and probably was sitting watching his old films and went, "I think I should fix this one." when he went over IV. (Source: www.amazon.com Did not like that Bridget Neilson parts were cut down and I prefer keeping the robot scene in. In fact, it would have been cool if he kept everything in with all the newly added parts and this baby clocks in like 2 hours. I'd love a version just like that cuz the original was always awesome in my book. However, this reboot does have a strong dramatic quality that I thoroughly enjoyed. A must see for all Balboa fans!!! (Source:www.amazon.com))

SERIES

So is Stallone’s new version, dubbed Rocky IV: Rocky vs. Drago, an improvement? In several cases, absolutely. As depicted in a re-making-of documentary currently available on YouTube, Stallone is aghast at the number of badly missed punches that made it into the 1985 theatrical cut. He’s proud of the final fight’s ferociousness (as he should be considering that a series of flush Lundgren punches to his chest left him with a swollen heart that landed him in the ICU), but in today’s blown-up HD world those occasional whiffs are glaringly obvious. In the recut, almost every punch lands with a realistic thud (although some of the absurdly jacked-up sound design has actually been dialed down). (Source: www.polygon.com)

There’s a tension in the Rocky series between two largely incompatible conceits: Rocky Balboa as the shy, humble, gentleman brawler from working-class Philly or Rocky Balboa as the cartoon avatar of America’s can-do spirit, intrepidly grinding through title matches against stronger, faster, more colorful opponents. The first type won a best picture Oscar for its young writer/star, Sylvester Stallone, who, in classic underdog fashion, was wildly overmatched against All the President’s Men, Bound for Glory, Network, and Taxi Driver. The second type dominated the next decade in ever-more garish and cynical vehicles, none dumber than Rocky IV, which pitted The Italian Stallion against Ivan Drago, a dead-eyed, machine-tooled robot of the Soviet empire. (Source: www.theguardian.com)

Critical reception was mixed, but the film was a huge success at the box office, earning $300 million. While the film marked Carl Weathers' final appearance in the series, his character would still be referenced in each subsequent film. Its success led to a Rocky V released on November 16, 1990. The events of this film serve as the backstory to the plot of Creed II, where Apollo Creed's son, Adonis, is challenged to fight Drago's son, Viktor. A director's cut of the film, entitled Rocky IV: Rocky Vs Drago, was released on November 11, 2021 in theaters, before releasing on digital the following day. (Source: en.wikipedia.org The two boxers spend the next dozen rounds trading blows, with Rocky managing to continually hold his ground despite Drago's best efforts. As the 12th round begins, the previously hostile Soviet crowd suddenly start chanting and cheering for Balboa. After being berated by Koloff, Drago rebels, throwing him from the ring and directly addressing Gorbachev, stating he fights only for himself. In the final round, with both fighters exhausted, Rocky initially takes more punishment, but manages to stay on his feet. Both fighters trade blows, before Balboa seizes an opening, unleashing a series of vicious blows, eventually knocking out Drago and avenging Apollo's death. (Source:en.wikipedia.org))

en.wikipedia.org en.wikipedia.org))Apollo Creed's wife Mary Anne (Sylvia Meals) made her second appearance in the series, the first being Rocky II, although the character was mainly featured in Rocky II. Stallone's future wife, Brigitte Nielsen, appeared as Drago's wife, The musical score for Rocky IV was composed by Vince DiCola, who would later compose the music for The Transformers: The Movie. Rocky IV is the only film in the series not to feature original music by Bill Conti, who was replaced by DiCola; however, it does feature arrangements of themes composed by Conti from previous films in the series, such as "The Final Bell". Conti, who was too busy with the first two Karate Kid films at the time, would return for Rocky V and Rocky Balboa. Conti's famous piece of music from the Rocky series, "Gonna Fly Now", does not appear at all in Rocky IV (the first time in the series this happened), though a few bars of it are incorporated into DiCola's training montage instrumental. (Source:Ludmilla. (Source:

USE

According to singer Peter Cetera, he originally wrote his best-selling solo single "Glory of Love" as the end title for this film, but was passed over by United Artists, and instead used the theme for The Karate Kid Part II. (Source: en.wikipedia.org

My first major problem was Sly's choice for the recap from Rocky III. He practically shows a huge chunk of footage from it, instead of the final fight montage we're used to. Most of it came from the scene in Mickey's gym between Rocky and Apollo. It took a little too long to get to the footage of the actual film. If the point was to emphasize Rocky and Apollo's friendship more, I thought the footage we had of them in IV was sufficient for that. (Source: www.amazon.com)Current AMC broadcasts in the US use the sped-up 25 fps PAL video from a 24 fps film source. (Source:www.imdb.com))

 

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