FutureStarr

Rice hulls vs perlite

Rice hulls vs perlite

Rice hulls vs perlite

Rice hulls (or rice husks) are the hard protecting coverings of grains of rice. In addition to protecting rice during the growing season, rice hulls can be put to use as building material, fertilizer, insulation material, or fuel. Rice hulls are part of the chaff of the rice.

Hull

Rice hulls are the coatings of seeds, or grains, of rice. The husk protects the seed during the growing season and is formed from hard materials, including opaline silica and lignin. The hull is hard to eat or swallow and mostly indigestible to humans because of its enriched fibre components. However, during times of food scarcity in ancient China, a common daily meal was a pastry made from rice husks, wild vegetables, and soybean powder. This led to the idiom "meals of cereal, hulls, and vegetables for half a year," indicating poverty and food insecurity. Winnowing, used to separate the rice from hulls, is to put the whole rice into a pan and throw it into the air while the wind blows. The light hulls are blown away while the heavy rice fall back into the pan. Later pestles and a simple machine called a rice pounder were developed to remove hulls. In 1885 the modern rice hulling machine was invented in Brazil. During the milling processes, the hulls are removed from the raw grain to reveal whole brown rice, which is then usually milled further to remove the bran layer, resulting in white rice.

As raw rice hulls. Low-quality roughages like ground rice hulls can be included in small amounts (up to 15%) in high-concentrate diets for feedlot cattle to help furnish bulk, stimulate appetite and decrease incidence of liver abscesses. In areas with a shortage of roughage, ground rice hulls can be used in place of straw or advantageously as a partial replacement for it. The addition of ground rice hulls has been found in some cases to increase the feed intake.As ammoniated rice hulls. A process developed for making livestock feed from hulls includes the addition of monocalcium phosphate, removal of silica, ammoniation under pressure and toasting. Ammoniated rice hulls have been used in proportions of up to 40% of the total ration for sheep, without digestive or mastication problems. (Source: www.feedipedia.org)

 

 

Related Articles