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Red baneberry uses

Red baneberry uses

Red baneberry uses

A bushy plant with large, highly divided leaves and a short, thick, rounded cluster of small white flowers in leaf axils or at stem ends. The branched, 1-3 ft. stems of this perennial bear two or three large compound leaves, each thrice divided. Leaflets are deeply saw-toothed. Above the foliage are dense, globular clusters of small white flowers. The fruit is an attractive, but poisonous, red berry.The red baneberry is a shrub in the family Ericaceae, native to southwestern North America. It is a tannin-rich plant, and was used by Native Americans for a variety of medicinal and culinary purposes.

Plant

Plants produce one to a few ternately branched stems which bear clusters of flowers having 3 to 5 sepals that are petal-like and obovate in shape and remain after flowering. The petals are deciduous, falling away after flowering is done. They are clawed at the base and 2.5 to 4 mm (0.10 to 0.16 in) long and spatulate to obovate in shape. Flowers have numerous stamens and they are white in color.The origin of the genus name (Actaea) is unclear. Some sources suggest that the name is from the Greek word aktea (elder) – a reference to an ancient name for elderberry, although there is little resemblance between elderberry and plants in the Actaea genus. The species name (rubra) is from the Latin for "red" and is a reference to the red berries that appear after flowering. Some older sources use the scientific name Actaea spicata, Actaea spicata var rubra, or Actaea neglecta. The author name (Aiton) is a reference to William Aiton, an 18

Pedicel: A small stalk bearing an individual flower in an inflorescence (flower cluster). ) which is about ½" inch long. The slender nature of the flower stalks is not always apparent when the plant begins to flower, but becomes easier to discern when the flower cluster matures. Each flower has 4 to 10 narrow, spear-shaped white petals, which fall off early as the plant blooms, leaving a dozen or more showy white stamens.Although most Red Baneberry plants bear red berries, there is a white-fruited form. This plant is generally rare, but distinguished from White Baneberry (Actaea pachypoda) by the fact that the fruit stalks are slender and green in color. In some regions, the white-fruited form of Red Baneberry is quite common. The distribution of the white-berried form of Red Baneberry in the Adirondacks is not known, but the absence of reports suggests it is relatively rare. (Source:wildadirondacks.org)

 

 

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