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Primrose Succulent

Primrose Succulent

Primrose Succulent

Something bugging your primrose plant? Watch for spider mites. Dry indoor air in the winter months encourages these pests to invade house plants, another reason to keep the humidity up. You'll first notice faint webbing on the undersides of leaves. If your plant is badly infested, get rid of it. These harmful pests will quickly move on to your other indoor plants.Water: Keep soil evenly moist. Primrose flowers need frequent watering to make them happy. Keep an indoor watering can nearby so that your plant won't go thirsty. This plant wilts quickly when the soil is dry. Use a pot with drainage holes to prevent soggy soil, which can lead to root rot. Yellow leaves are a sign of overwatering.

Primrose

There are over 400 species of primulas, or primroses, found in habitats ranging from marshlands to alpine slopes. Primrose foliage forms rosettes – clusters of leaves in a circle - that grow close to the ground. The flowers grow either clustered together among the leaves or on stalks in umbels, whorls or spikes. Primroses are ideal for a waterside garden, shade garden, or rock garden and some varieties can be used as bedding plants.Primula vulgaris (wild primrose) – An evergreen to semi-evergreen perennial, it has clusters of 3 to 25 pale, yellow flowers in early spring. They prefer partial shade but are fine in sun if the soil is kept moist. Wonderful for a wood's edge, the clumps can be divided in September or in early spring before they flower. Good cultivars include Primula ‘Quaker’s Bonnet’ (double, lavender), Primula ‘Cottage White’ (double white) and Primula ‘Marie Crousse’ (double violet).

Much breeding took place in the late 19th and early 20th century and continues to this day bringing us new colours and markings. One of the most outstanding recent introductions is the blue evening primrose plant 'Zebra Blue' with remarkable bright blue blossoms, striped with white and a yellow eye. Flowering from March until June, they look stunning in pots or borders.There are over 400 species of primulas, or primroses, found in habitats ranging from marshlands to alpine slopes. Primrose foliage forms rosettes – clusters of leaves in a circle - that grow close to the ground. The flowers grow either clustered together among the leaves or on stalks in umbels, whorls or spikes. Primroses are ideal for a waterside garden, shade garden, or rock garden and some varieties can be used as bedding plants. (Source: libguides.nybg.org)

 

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