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Prairie smoke bbq

Prairie smoke bbq

Prairie smoke bbq

Prairie smoke is among the earliest bloomers on the prairie. It blooms in late spring through early summer, bearing clusters of nodding reddish-pink, maroon or purple flowers on 12-18” stems. There may be up to 9 flowers on each stem but flowers generally occur in threes (hence the species name). The sepals of these globular flowers are fused, so they cannot open completely. There are 5 elongate, pointed sepal lobes on each ½ to ¾” flower. Bees have to force their way in to pollinate the flowers.

Prairie

Prairie smoke is tolerant of many soil types, growing equally well in sandy, loamy, and clay soils, although it prefers a well-drained site, in full sun. Flowering is reduced in shade. It likes a soil rich in organic matter, but also does well in the leaner soil of the rock garden, where it tends to be smaller in stature. Although it does not need a lot of water, it is not completely drought tolerant either. It needs moist conditions in spring, tolerates drier conditions in summer, and does not like to be wet in winter. A southern or western exposure is best.The silky, flowing styles of the fruiting stage of Prairie Smoke never fail to win admirers at first sight. When setting seed, large stands of the plant create a gauzy effect that resembles smoke hovering close to the ground. Blooming in spring to early summer, Prairie Smoke will spread slowly from its roots in well-drained, dry to wet-mesic soils. It prefers full to partial sun and has a native range from the northern tier of the US through most of Canada.

Prairie smoke (Geum triflorum) may not be a show-stopping plant. But it will add plenty of interest to a garden bed from early spring right through to fall. This perennial wildflower is native to North American prairies. It gets its name from the long, wispy, feather-like achenes (seed heads) that develop during the summer. With their pinkish shades, they create an impression of puffs of smoke. And they remain on the plant for several weeks. The small, pink, bud-like flowers may not be as impressive as the achenes, but they still add a splash of color to the garden starting in the spring. And during the fall, the foliage takes on purplish, reddish, and orange hues and then turns to a burgundy shade come winter.Prairie smoke is a versatile, low-maintenance perennial. It can tolerate various soil types, provided that it has good drainage. It doesn't require deadheading (removing spent blooms) or need much in the way of watering. And it is even fairly tolerant of drought during the summer. In addition, prairie smoke doesn't usually have any serious issues with pests or diseases, and deer in particular tend to leave it alone. But it is known to attract butterflies to the garden. (Source: www.thespruce.com)

 

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